Explore awards

Content
Filter by
Recipient
Competition
139 results  

Carbon Networks

Funding: 
$88,478
Year: 
2014

Carbon Networks addresses the disconnect between scientific evidence and the public’s understanding of the impacts of ocean acidification and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

Carbon Networks addresses the disconnect between scientific evidence and the public’s understanding of the impacts of ocean acidification and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It brings together three diverse, informal education partners – the Exploratorium in San Francisco, the Waikiki Aquarium in Hawaii, and the Pacific Science Center in Seattle – in a collaborative project to co-design and implement professional development for staff and local educators, as well as create educational programs and activities for museum visitors to better understand the evolving narrative and impact of ocean acidification and climate change.

Competition: 2013: ELG for Building Capacity of Informal and Formal Educators
Award Number: 
NA14SEC0080003
Grant Dates: 
09/01/2014 to 08/31/2017
PI: 
Ms. Keni Sturgeon
State: Washington   County: King   District: WA07 
Partners:   Exploratorium, Seattle Aquarium, U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System / NANOOS, University of California at Santa Barbara, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) / West Coast, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) / Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Channel Islands, National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Greater Farallones, National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Cordell Bank, National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Olympic Coast, U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System / CeNCOOS, University of California—Berkeley, National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Monterey Bay, University of Hawaii System / Waikiki Aquarium, National Sea Grant College Program / University of Washington (UW), U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System / PacIOOS National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) / Alaska Fisheries Science Center

Advancing Climate Literacy through Investment in In-service and Pre-service Science Educators (ACLIPSE)

Funding: 
$608,513
Year: 
2014

The ACLIPSE project leveraged NOAA assets including the NOAA-funded Ocean Sciences Sequence for Grades 6–8: The Ocean–Atmosphere Connection and Climate Change, data from NOAA-supported ocean, estuarine and atmospheric observing networks, and NOAA-affiliated scientists.

The ACLIPSE project leveraged NOAA assets including the NOAA-funded Ocean Sciences Sequence for Grades 6–8: The Ocean–Atmosphere Connection and Climate Change, data from NOAA-supported ocean, estuarine and atmospheric observing networks, and NOAA-affiliated scientists. ACLIPSE developed strategies for incorporating real-time ocean observing data into climate and ocean science education; designed and implemented an undergraduate curriculum in climate science for pre-service (student) teachers at multiple universities (http://mare.lawrencehallofscience.org/college-courses/ACLIPSE); offered a variety of workshops for teachers and educators across the country and at National Estuarine Research Reserves (NERRs); and developed materials specifically designed to provide professional learning and instructional materials for middle and high school teachers to use with their students and other learners (http://mare.lawrencehallofscience.org/curriculum/climate-data-aclipse-ac...). The professional learning workshops for local teachers and NERR Education Coordinators and research staff (i.e., System Wide Monitoring Program (SWMP) Technicians) were located at five NERR sites representing different regions of the US, including the Pacific Northwest (Kachemak Bay NERR, Alaska and Padilla Bay NERR, WA), central West Coast (San Francisco NERR, CA), Southeast (GTM NERR, FL), and Northeast/Mid-Atlantic (Jacques Cousteau NERR, NJ). Resources and instructional materials focused on climate and ocean acidification were provided to all participants for learning about and teaching these important and relevant content areas, and as the context for teaching about and applying current teaching and learning research. Emphasis was placed on helping the teacher audiences to becoming more expert on how to use NOAA monitoring data in the classroom in authentic and engaging ways to build teacher and student data skills. NERR educators and their local in-service teachers were provided with professional learning opportunities and a collection of activities providing online data, place-based, locally relevant observing data, NGSS teaching and learning pedagogy, and climate change topics. The project built capacity of formal and informal science educators by providing (1) opportunities to become knowledgeable about global environmental change and real-time data; (2) exposure to place-based connections with the ocean through technological observing systems; and (3) materials and expertise to apply their learning to teaching practice in a long-term, sustainable manner. ACLIPSE instructional materials are based on the principle that real-time environmental data is a valuable tool for providing students with opportunities for self-directed exploration of the natural world. Students engaging in these activities gain a deeper understanding of carbon cycling, ocean acidification, and other phenomena related to climate change. These activities were designed with the three-dimensional approach to teaching in mind (e.g. NGSS-designed), and also use a data literacy framework to build educators and their learners’ skills in using data visualizations. The materials for informal educators and grades 6-8 teachers can also be accessed from the NOAA Education site, Classroom- Ready Data Resources, Climate & Data ACLIPSE Activities at https://www.noaa.gov/education/resourcecollections/data-resources-for-ed.... Partners in the project included Rutgers University, Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Florida State University, California State University East Bay, Louisiana State University, and multiple NERR sites and Education Coordinators across the country and their local secondary teachers.

Competition: 2013: ELG for Building Capacity of Informal and Formal Educators
Award Number: 
NA14SEC0080004
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2014 to 03/31/2019
PI: 
Ms. Catherine Halversen
State: California   County: Alameda   District: CA13 
Partners:   Western Washington University, Florida State University, National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) Jacques Cousteau, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), Louisiana State University (LSU), Northern Arizona University, California State University, East Bay (CSUEB), Rutgers University, National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR), National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) Guana Tolomato Matanzas, National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) Kachemak Bay, National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) North Inlet-Winyah Bay, National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) San Francisco Bay

Advancing Climate Literacy through Investment in In-service and Pre-service Science Educators (ACLIPSE)

Funding: 
$31,192
Year: 
2014

This three-year project leverages NOAA assets including the NOAA-funded Ocean Sciences Sequence for Grades 6–8: The Ocean–Atmosphere Connection and Climate Change, data from NOAA-supported ocean, estuarine and atmospheric observing networks, and NOAA-affiliated scientists. The goal is to design and implement a complementary suite of materials, courses and workshops for university teacher educators to use with middle school in-service and preservice teachers.

This three-year project leverages NOAA assets including the NOAA-funded Ocean Sciences Sequence for Grades 6–8: The Ocean–Atmosphere Connection and Climate Change, data from NOAA-supported ocean, estuarine and atmospheric observing networks, and NOAA-affiliated scientists. The goal is to design and implement a complementary suite of materials, courses and workshops for university teacher educators to use with middle school in-service and preservice teachers. The project builds capacity of formal science educators by providing (1) opportunities to become knowledgeable about global environmental change and real-time data; (2) exposure to different climate knowledge systems through place-based connections with the ocean through technological and/or indigenous observing systems; and (3) materials and expertise to apply their learning to teaching practice in a long-term, sustainable manner. Educational partners in the project include Louisiana State University, Florida State University, California State University East Bay, and middle school teachers from Tribal communities in Washington state.

Competition: 2013: ELG for Building Capacity of Informal and Formal Educators
Award Number: 
NA14SEC0080005
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2014 to 06/01/2015
PI: 
Dr. Jude Apple
State: Washington   County: Whatcom   District: WA02 
Partners:   University of California at Berkeley / Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS)

Continuing of the National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB) Competitions

Funding: 
$154,934
Year: 
2014

The National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB), initiated in 1998, is a nationally recognized high school academic competition through which talented students excel in the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields and are introduced to ocean science as an interdisciplinary field of study and a possible career path.

The National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB), initiated in 1998, is a nationally recognized high school academic competition through which talented students excel in the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields and are introduced to ocean science as an interdisciplinary field of study and a possible career path. As the NOSB also engages high school teachers, schools, and local communities in the competition and other program elements, it results in broader awareness of the ocean sciences and environmental issues and increased attitudes toward stewardship of ocean resources within these audiences. The program operates with the involvement of the ocean science research and professional community. Support from NOAA is requested to support about 20% of NOSB national office staff time needed for total program implementation, subawards to the regional competitions, and site visits for planning the 2015 national finals.

Competition: 2014: National Ocean Sciences Competition for High School Students
Award Number: 
NA14SEC0080006
Grant Dates: 
09/01/2014 to 08/31/2015
PI: 
Ms. Kristen Yarincik
State: District of Columbia   County: District of Columbia   District: DC00 

National Marine Sanctuary Foundation Education Partnerships

Funding: 
$1,226,820
Year: 
2014

This project supports environmental education and outreach activities that promote the ocean and coastal stewardship and climate literacy goals of NOAA and the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation. Specifically, the partnership supports: (1) development of education and outreach materials; (2) professional development to educators and science communicators, (3) competitions that promote the goals of the partnership; (4) the activities of the Science on a Sphere® Users Collaborative Network; and (4) evaluation of partners’ programs.

This project supports environmental education and outreach activities that promote the ocean and coastal stewardship and climate literacy goals of NOAA and the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation. Specifically, the partnership supports: (1) development of education and outreach materials; (2) professional development to educators and science communicators, (3) competitions that promote the goals of the partnership; (4) the activities of the Science on a Sphere® Users Collaborative Network; and (4) evaluation of partners’ programs.

Competition: 2014: NOAA Broad Agency Announcement for FY 2014 - 2015
Award Number: 
NA14SEC0080007
Grant Dates: 
09/01/2014 to 01/31/2018
PI: 
Ms. Allison Alexander
State: Maryland   County: Montgomery   District: MD08 
Partners:   Society for Science & the Public (SSP)

Advancing Climate Literacy through Investment in In-service and Pre-service Science Educators (ACLIPSE)

Funding: 
$273,771
Year: 
2015

This three-year project leverages NOAA assets including the NOAA-funded Ocean Sciences Sequence for Grades 6–8: The Ocean–Atmosphere Connection and Climate Change, data from NOAA-supported ocean, estuarine and atmospheric observing networks, and NOAA-affiliated scientists. The goal is to design and implement a complementary suite of materials, courses and workshops for university teacher educators to use with middle school in-service and preservice teachers.

This three-year project leverages NOAA assets including the NOAA-funded Ocean Sciences Sequence for Grades 6–8: The Ocean–Atmosphere Connection and Climate Change, data from NOAA-supported ocean, estuarine and atmospheric observing networks, and NOAA-affiliated scientists. The goal is to design and implement a complementary suite of materials, courses and workshops for university teacher educators to use with middle school in-service and preservice teachers. The project builds capacity of formal science educators by providing (1) opportunities to become knowledgeable about global environmental change and real-time data; (2) exposure to different climate knowledge systems through place-based connections with the ocean through technological and/or indigenous observing systems; and (3) materials and expertise to apply their learning to teaching practice in a long-term, sustainable manner. Educational partners in the project include Louisiana State University, Florida State University, California State University East Bay, and middle school teachers from Tribal communities in Washington state.

Competition: 2013: ELG for Building Capacity of Informal and Formal Educators
Award Number: 
NA15SEC0080001
Grant Dates: 
06/01/2015 to 09/30/2019
PI: 
Dr. Jude Apple
State: Washington   County: Thurston   District: WA10 
Partners:   University of California at Berkeley / Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS) Washington State / Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction

Continuing of the National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB) Competitions

Funding: 
$1,500,000
Year: 
2015

The National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB), managed by The Consortium for Ocean Leadership, provides enriched science education and learning through a nationally recognized and highly acclaimed academic competition that increases high school students’ knowledge of the marine sciences, including the science disciplines of biology, chemistry, physics, and geology.

The National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB), managed by The Consortium for Ocean Leadership, provides enriched science education and learning through a nationally recognized and highly acclaimed academic competition that increases high school students’ knowledge of the marine sciences, including the science disciplines of biology, chemistry, physics, and geology. The NOSB addresses a national gap in environmental and Earth sciences in K-12 education by introducing high school students to and engaging them in ocean sciences, preparing them for careers in ocean science and other science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Currently, there are 25 regions in the U.S. that compete in the NOSB, each with their own regional competitions. The regional competitions are coordinated by the Regional Coordinators, who are typically affiliated with a university in their region. Each year approximately 2,000 students from 300 schools across the nation compete for prizes and a trip to the national competition. The goal of this organization is to increase knowledge of the ocean among high school students and, ultimately, magnify the public understanding of ocean research. Students who participate are eligible to apply for the National Ocean Scholar Program.

Competition: 2015: National Ocean Sciences Competition for High School Students
Award Number: 
NA15SEC0080002
Grant Dates: 
09/01/2015 to 08/31/2021
PI: 
Ms. Kristen Yarincik
State: District of Columbia   County: District of Columbia   District: DC00 
Partners:   Seward Association for the Advancement of Marine Science / Alaska SeaLife Center, Florida Atlantic University / Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, George Mason University / Center for Climate Change Communication (4C), Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, San Francisco State University (SFSU) / Center for Science and Mathematics Education, University of South Florida / College of Marine Science (CMS), NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Oregon State University (OSU) / College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alaska (UA-Fairbanks) / College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder / Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), University of Miami / Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS), University of New England (UNE) / Center for Excellence in the Marine Sciences (CEMS), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) / Institute of Marine Science, University of Southern Mississippi (USM) / Marine Education Center (MEC), University of Washington (UW) / School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (SAFS), Virginia Institute of Marine Science / Marine Advisory Services, Youngstown State University, National Sea Grant College Program / New York Sea Grant College Program, National Sea Grant College Program / Virginia Institute of Marine Science, National Sea Grant College Program / University of Connecticut, Old Dominion University (ODU) / Ocean, Earth & Atmospheric Sciences, National Sea Grant College Program / Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), National Sea Grant College Program / Texas A&M University, University of Michigan / Michigan Sea Grant, National Sea Grant College Program / University of Washington (UW), Stanford University / School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences, Eastman Chemical Company, Savannah State University / Department of Marine & Environmental Sciences, Texas A&M University at Galveston, University of Michigan / School for Environment and Sustainability (SEAS) / CILER, The University of Texas at Austin / Marine Science Institute, National Sea Grant College Program / University of Alaska (UA-Fairbanks) / Alaska Sea Grant, National Sea Grant College Program / University of Delaware / Delaware Sea Grant, National Sea Grant College Program / University of Hawaii System / Hawaii Sea Grant, National Sea Grant College Program / University of Maine / Maine Sea Grant, National Sea Grant College Program / University of New Hampshire (UNH) / New Hampshire Sea Grant, State University of New York at Stony Brook / School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), Rutgers University / Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, University of San Diego / Department of Environmental & Ocean Sciences, California State University, Monterey Bay (CSUMB) / School of Natural Sciences, University of Wisconsin (UW–Milwaukee) / School of Freshwater Sciences, University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW) / MarineQuest, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), American Honda Foundation, University of Miami / Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science East Carolina University (ECU) / Coastal Studies Institute

Global, Local, Coastal: Preparing The Next Generation for A Changing Planet

Funding: 
$468,428
Year: 
2015

This project, “Global, Local, Coastal: Preparing the Next Generation for A Changing Planet," was led by Groundwork Hudson Valley in partnership with Sarah Lawrence College's Center for the Urban River, to integrate and expand the work of three award-winning environmental education centers in Yonkers, NY – The Science Barge, Ecohouse and the Center for the Urban River (CURB).

This project, “Global, Local, Coastal: Preparing the Next Generation for A Changing Planet," was led by Groundwork Hudson Valley in partnership with Sarah Lawrence College's Center for the Urban River, to integrate and expand the work of three award-winning environmental education centers in Yonkers, NY – The Science Barge, Ecohouse and the Center for the Urban River (CURB). Its primary objective was to prepare low-income students for the impact of a changing climate so that they can participate both personally and professionally in a world in which these issues are increasingly prevalent. It reached an audience that is not well served by traditional programs and is most vulnerable to the consequences of climate change. Over the course of two years, the project served 544 high school youth from the Yonkers public school system through a new, integrated curriculum that presented these issues from multiple perspectives in an experiential learning format. Beyond its impact on students, the project has had a broader impact on people in our region who have visited the Science Barge, Ecohouse and CURB, which together receive close to 10,000 people each year. The new exhibits have reinforced key themes related to resiliency and adaptation and staff have integrated these concepts into their public tours. Beyond our region, the project has further impacted STEM educators across the country with access to the newly created "Global, Local, Coastal" curriculum and web application which is posted on Groundwork's website and accessible without charge. Other partners included NOAA’s Hudson River National Estuarine Research Reserve, the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, and Center for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), and Yonkers Public Schools. The project has been carried out in a community that has been severely affected by extreme weather in the last decade, including three hurricanes. Outcomes have helped to create “an informed society to anticipate and respond to climate and its impacts” and served to support NOAA’s goal of a developing a “Weather-Ready Nation” and “Resilient Coastal Communities and Economies.”

Competition: 2015: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Changes
Award Number: 
NA15SEC0080004
Grant Dates: 
09/01/2015 to 06/30/2019
PI: 
Ms. Ellen Theg
State: New York   County: Westchester   District: NY16 
Partners:   Columbia University / Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory / Earth Institute, Sarah Lawrence College / Center for the Urban River at Beczak (CURB), International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), Consortium for Climate Risk in the Urban Northeast (CCRUN), National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) Hudson River, NYS Office of Storm Recovery (GOSR), Yonkers Public Schools / Charles E. Gorton High School, Hitachi America, Ltd., Yonkers Public Schools / Community School 13, Alliance for Climate Education, Yonkers Public Schools / Riverside High School for Engineering and Design, Yonkers Public Schools / Saunders Trades and Technical High School, Yonkers Public Schools, Yonkers Public Schools / Lincoln High School Yonkers Public Schools / Robert C. Dodson School

Science Center Public Forums: Community Engagement for Environmental Literacy, Improved Resilience, and Decision-Making

Funding: 
$499,901
Year: 
2015

By engaging diverse publics in immersive and deliberative learning forums, this three-year project will use NOAA data and expertise to strengthen community resilience and decision-making around a variety of climate and weather-related hazards across the United States. Led by Arizona State University’s Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes and the Museum of Science Boston, the project will develop citizen forums hosted by regional science centers to create a new, replicable model for learning and engagement.

By engaging diverse publics in immersive and deliberative learning forums, this three-year project will use NOAA data and expertise to strengthen community resilience and decision-making around a variety of climate and weather-related hazards across the United States. Led by Arizona State University’s Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes and the Museum of Science Boston, the project will develop citizen forums hosted by regional science centers to create a new, replicable model for learning and engagement. These forums, to be hosted initially in Boston and Phoenix and then expanded to an additional six sites around the U.S., will facilitate public deliberation on real-world issues of concern to local communities, including rising sea levels, extreme precipitation, heat waves, and drought. The forums will identify and clarify citizen values and perspectives while creating stakeholder networks in support of local resilience measures. The forum materials developed in collaboration with NOAA will foster better understanding of environmental changes and best practices for improving community resiliency, and will create a suite of materials and case studies adaptable for use by science centers, teachers, and students. With regional science centers bringing together the public, scientific experts, and local officials, the project will create resilience-centered partnerships and a framework for learning and engagement that can be replicated nationwide.

Competition: 2015: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Changes
Award Number: 
NA15SEC0080005
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2015 to 03/31/2019
PI: 
Dr. Dan Sarewitz
State: Arizona   County: Maricopa   District: AZ09 
Partners:   Bishop Museum, Science Museum of Minnesota, Northeastern University (NU) / Marine Science Center (MSC), Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI), Museum of Science Boston, Arizona Science Center, Chabot Space and Science Center, Museum of Life and Science, Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association, City of Cambridge, U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), NOAA Climate Program Office (CPO), University of Arizona / College of Agriculture & Life Sciences / Arizona Project WET, UM School for the Environment, Boston Harbor Now, City of Boston, Newton Public Schools / Newton North High School, Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM), Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, University of Southern Alabama / Civil, Coastal, and Environmental Engineering, North Suffolk Mental Health, Arizona State University (ASU) / Decision Center for a Desert City (DCDC), City of Louisville City of Honolulu / Office of Climate Change, Sustainability and Resiliency

Public Libraries Advancing Community Engagement (PLACE)

Califa · San Mateo, California
Funding: 
$499,919
Year: 
2015

Public Libraries Advancing Community Engagement: Environmental Literacy Through Climate Change Discussions (PLACE) is a nationally disseminated, locally-based program that engages adults in geographic-specific discussions and critical thinking about resilient responses to environmental changes and extreme weather events, through programs in their local public libraries.

Public Libraries Advancing Community Engagement: Environmental Literacy Through Climate Change Discussions (PLACE) is a nationally disseminated, locally-based program that engages adults in geographic-specific discussions and critical thinking about resilient responses to environmental changes and extreme weather events, through programs in their local public libraries. Historically, opportunities to increase adults’ environmental literacy have typically been available only through established science centers, and/or tended to target citizens who are already interested in environmental topics and issues. While science center hosted events and exhibits are important, reaching new and underserved audiences is imperative. PLACE engages new audiences — in their own libraries and with their own communities — by discussing their challenges, threats and helping their communities prepare for and respond to climate change and extreme weather events. PLACE will help rural and under-resourced communities build resilience to their region's’ unique vulnerabilities and threats through the following: (1) Select 50 rural and under-resourced libraries across the United States, (2) Create environmental literacy materials for library programs and professional development materials for librarians, (3) Provide professional development to participating librarians, developing their environmental literacy and fostering the use of NOAA assets for library patron services, (4) Assist libraries in finding and partnering with NOAA scientists, (5) Support libraries implementing a three-part, environmental literacy book/video/discussion program series for adults, complemented by a curated collection of NOAA assets that align with each program’s topic, and (6) Perform a summative evaluation of the impact and outcomes of the program. The project has a sustainability plan and a network in place to support the activities in an ongoing, national model for years beyond the initial project funding. PLACE leverages the model and resources of an earlier, similar program, Pushing the Limits (funded by the National Science Foundation), which demonstrated significant success in raising adults’ general science literacy in rural libraries across the United States. The project is being created, disseminated and evaluated through a partnership of The Califa Group (a California library consortium) and the National Weather Service, working in tandem with NOAA’s Office of Education.

Competition: 2015: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Changes
Award Number: 
NA15SEC0080008
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2015 to 01/31/2018
PI: 
Ms. Paula Mackinnon
State: California   County: San Mateo   District: CA14 
Partners:   NOAA National Weather Service (NWS), NOAA Climate Program Office (CPO) NOAA Office of Education

Learn, Prepare, Act – Resilient Citizens Make Resilient Communities

Funding: 
$477,052
Year: 
2015

The Science Museum of Virginia’s three-year informal climate change resilience education project, “Your Actions Matter: Resilient Citizens Make Resilient Communities,” yielded three overarching lessons learned: 1) understand and use organizational strengths and limitations to advance resilience education, 2) Arts and Humanities are critical for resilience education, and 3) localize the story of climate change and its solutions.

The Science Museum of Virginia’s three-year informal climate change resilience education project, “Your Actions Matter: Resilient Citizens Make Resilient Communities,” yielded three overarching lessons learned: 1) understand and use organizational strengths and limitations to advance resilience education, 2) Arts and Humanities are critical for resilience education, and 3) localize the story of climate change and its solutions. Our programming relied on planning and executing two, 5-week “Climate Connections” Lecture Series featuring national climate science researchers, three annual Prepareathon events to connect communities with emergency management personnel and services (as well as local meteorologists and climate scientists), two community-focused workshops to engage guests in building resilience to extreme precipitation and urban heat, producing dozens of radio and video programs for public dissemination of climate science concepts, hosting several “Extreme Event Challenge” facilitations for guests to assume manager roles in a crisis, designed numerous scripts and dataset playlists for daily SOS presentations, production of a large format film about cosmic perspectives on climate change, performed theatrical scripts of human sides of climate impacts, leveraged artistic expression and sonification of climate science datasets in public events and exhibitss, and undertook the first citizen science climate change campaign in the Museum’s history. Our audiences regularly stretched from preschool learners to retirement-aged individuals, served many thousands from formal education and professional organizations, and that our programming regularly attracted audiences from government agencies, policymakers, fine arts institutions, and urban planners. Our audience reach easily surpassed 1.2 million people locally, nationally, and internationally, with most from metro-Richmond, Virginia. We report significant accomplishments related to Based on formative evaluation, our substantial restructuring of our initially proposed programming model yielded high-impact educational outcomes. “Ready Row Homes: Preparing for a Hotter, Wetter Virginia” experience achieved highest educational impact of communicating both climate change science and individual resilience behaviors. Our SOS facilitations and Large Format Film, Cosmic Climate Cookbook, performed highly in communicating climate science, but relatively limited in resilience behavior. Extreme Event Challenge has high impact for communicating resilience strategies, but not as well in communicating climate science. Our informative climate science Lecture Series were comparatively limited in communicating resilience. This array of programming successes was greatly improved by collaborations with project partners: WCVE disseminated audio and video programs; George Mason University's Center for Climate Change Communication guided our storytelling techniques for SOS; NOAA assets (i.e., NWS, Chesapeake Bay Office, SOS Network) contributed information and speakers; Randi Korn & Associates provided evaluation; Resilient Virginia marketed programs and designed workshops; and Virginia Institute of Marine Science provided significant expertise through speakers and datasets. New, substantial project partners included Groundwork RVA (co-developed “Throwing Shade in RVA” teen program and participated in urban heat island citizen science projects); Alliance for Chesapeake Bay (provided free rain barrels and workshop educational content); Richmond City’s Department of Planning Review and Sustainability Office coordinated dissemination of outreach materials and executed urban heat island citizen science project; and Franklin Institute (helped guide development of a Virginia-specific facilitation of Ready Row Home hands-on experiences).

Competition: 2015: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Changes
Award Number: 
NA15SEC0080009
Grant Dates: 
01/01/2016 to 12/31/2018
PI: 
Mr. Jeremy Hoffman
State: Virginia   County: Richmond City   District: VA04 
Partners:   University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Center for Science Education, George Mason University / Center for Climate Change Communication (4C), Franklin Institute, Nature Conservancy Headquarters, Virginia Institute of Marine Science / Marine Advisory Services, NOAA Climate Program Office (CPO), Resilient Virginia, Community Idea Stations, NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office, NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Wakefield, VA Forecast Office, National Sea Grant College Program / Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Virginia Environmental Endowment, Virginia Commonwealth University / Center for Environmental Studies, Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, University of Richmond, Virginia Commonwealth University / School of the Arts, Virginia Commonwealth University / School of Engineering, Richmond City Sustainability, Portland State University / Sustaining Urban Places Research (SUPR) Lab, Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (VDEQ), Virginia Department of Health (VDH), Sierra Club / Virginia Chapter, Virginia Academy of Science, Groundwork RVA, City of Richmond / Planning and Development Review, Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden / Beautiful RVA, Maryland Department of Health, Department of Energy and Environment Enrichmond Foundation

Community Resilience Informed by Science and Experience (C-RISE)

Funding: 
$499,181
Year: 
2015

The goal of Community Resilience Informed by Science and Experience (C-RISE) was to build the capacity of coastal communities to support resiliency planning and adaptation actions.

The goal of Community Resilience Informed by Science and Experience (C-RISE) was to build the capacity of coastal communities to support resiliency planning and adaptation actions. To accomplish this the Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI) worked with an advisory group including representatives from NOAA’s Office for Coastal Management, Maine Geological Survey, Maine Department of Environmental Protection, the cities of Portland and South Portland, Greater Portland Council of Governments, New England Environmental Finance Center, and Axiom Technologies to develop public programming that provided participants with knowledge of and access to local sea level rise data. This program, "Preparing Coastal Communities for Sea Level Rise" is a community education event that built participant knowledge in sea level rise science, future projections, and local impacts. Through visual presentations and facilitated discussions, GMRI brought regional relevancy to global climate data using local history and case studies of past flooding events. Using technology and peer discussions, GMRI staff provided participants with access to interactive data sets and maps that visualized the impacts of sea level rise and weather events on community resources like roads, parks, hospitals, schools, and other valued assets—and how climate projections will increase these impacts over time. Over the course of this grant, GMRI staff facilitated over 60 community events in over 30 coastal communities in Maine, reaching over 2,000 individuals. While many of the participants had heard about sea level rise and storm surge prior to this program, few had internalized what this meant for their own communities. Post-event surveys indicated that participants discussed flooding issues with their families, friends, and neighbors, further examined local sea level rise maps, and engaged with community decision-makers about resiliency planning. GMRI believes that strong and informed representation of citizens is vital to addressing climate challenges and resiliency actions. We continue to leverage this work through various projects as we collaborate with coastal communities to provide them with knowledge, skills, and tools needed to develop community-focused resilience plans for sea level rise.

Competition: 2015: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Changes
Award Number: 
NA15SEC0080006
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2015 to 09/30/2019
PI: 
Ms. Leigh Peake
State: Maine   County: Cumberland   District: ME01 
Partners:   NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM), City of South Portland, City of Portland, Greater Portland Council of Governments (GPCOG), University of Southern Maine / New England Environmental Finance Center, Axiom Technologies, Southern Maine Conservation Collaborative, Maine Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), Island Institute, Maine Geological Survey, Harpswell Heritage Land Trust, Nature Conservancy / Maine Field Office, Portland Society for Architecture Upswell

From Mt. Rainier to the Pacific Coast: Fostering Resilient Climate Leaders, Communities and Coastal Ecosystems

Funding: 
$298,713
Year: 
2015

Nisqually River Foundation with partners (South Sound GREEN, Chehalis Basin Education Consortium, and Mount Rainier Institute) with support from NOAA Fisheries’ West Coast Region implemented their project, “From Mt. Rainier to the Pacific Coast: Fostering Resilient Climate Leaders, Communities and Coastal Ecosystems,” over 3 years, from 2016-2018. Our region faces the climate change threats of sea level rise, receding glaciers, extreme weather/flooding, ocean acidification and impacts on humans and important local resources, such as surface and groundwater, salmon, forests, and shellfish.

Nisqually River Foundation with partners (South Sound GREEN, Chehalis Basin Education Consortium, and Mount Rainier Institute) with support from NOAA Fisheries’ West Coast Region implemented their project, “From Mt. Rainier to the Pacific Coast: Fostering Resilient Climate Leaders, Communities and Coastal Ecosystems,” over 3 years, from 2016-2018. Our region faces the climate change threats of sea level rise, receding glaciers, extreme weather/flooding, ocean acidification and impacts on humans and important local resources, such as surface and groundwater, salmon, forests, and shellfish. Together we engaged more than 120 teachers and their 3,000+ students from the Nisqually, South Puget Sound and Chehalis watersheds to understand and predict changes in climate, weather, oceans, and coasts. We held three Summer Teachers Institutes to bring teachers connect teachers with local science experts in climate change impacts in the Pacific Northwest. Our 2017 Institute was held in partnership with Mount Rainier Institute, who also hosted Climate Resilient Youth Leadership Programs for 350 12-18-year olds. Participants generated and participated in Community Resilience Action Projects to conserve local ecosystems and increase resiliency in their communities to extreme weather events and changing climate. These projects included: riparian habitat restoration in the Nisqually, Chehalis, and Deschutes basins; creating recycling and composting programs on school campuses; eliminating Styrofoam from school cafeterias; creating a Migration Parade event to explore climate impacts on migratory species; the “Pick a DOT- Do One Thing - What’s your thing?” on-line videos; and the creation of high-impact environmental education art installations, to name a handful. Students also monitored local stream flows, temperatures, and water quality, building on a previous Targeted Watershed Grant from the EPA and a data set that goes back to 1992. NOAA’s mission of Service was supported as teachers and students shared their knowledge in their classrooms, with school districts, at community meetings, and through social media. NOAA assets used included the NW Marine Fisheries staff, Data in the Classroom, CoCoRaHS, NOAA-NASA Cloud Watcher Chart, NOAA’s Climate Literacy Principles, Beat the Uncertainty game, Game of Floods, Thermal Expansion label, the Marine Mammals of the US West Coast, and more. Other local contributing partners include the Nisqually Indian Tribe, the Squaxin Tribe, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Nisqually Land Trust, Thurston Conservation District and Capital Region Educational Service District 113.

Competition: 2015: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Changes
Award Number: 
NA15SEC0080007
Grant Dates: 
04/01/2016 to 07/31/2019
PI: 
Mr. Justin Hall
State: Washington   County: Thurston   District: WA10 
Partners:   National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) / West Coast, Chehalis Basin Education Consortium, South Sound GREEN (Global Rivers Environmental Education Network), Mount Rainier Institute, U.S. National Park Service / Mount Rainier National Park, Nisqually Land Trust, Capitol Land Trust, Chehalis River Basin Land Trust, NOAA Office of Education, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service / Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge, Nisqually Tribe, Joint Base Lewis–McChord, Mason Conservation District, Squaxin Island Tribe Puget Sound Estuarium

Teen Advocates for Community and Environmental Sustainability (Teen ACES)

Funding: 
$498,471
Year: 
2016

The Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago (MSI) will develop museum-based education resources to engage high school age youth in the exploration of climate literacy and Earth systems science through its Teen ACES (Teen Advocates for Community and Environmental Sustainability) project. As the future leaders who will make decisions about the issues they face in their communities, youth participants will be positioned to act as advocates for establishing resilient communities in the Midwest.

The Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago (MSI) will develop museum-based education resources to engage high school age youth in the exploration of climate literacy and Earth systems science through its Teen ACES (Teen Advocates for Community and Environmental Sustainability) project. As the future leaders who will make decisions about the issues they face in their communities, youth participants will be positioned to act as advocates for establishing resilient communities in the Midwest. The project will utilize a variety of resources, including NOAA Science On a Sphere® (SOS) technology and datasets, Great Lakes and local climate assets from the Midwest Regional Climate Center and Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant, and existing local planning guides to develop museum-based youth programming. Teens will explore environmental hazards including severe weather events and temperature extremes, and consider the impact of the Great Lakes on regional climate. The Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, Resilient Chicago, the Institute of Environmental Sustainability at Loyola University Chicago, and the South Metropolitan Higher Education Consortium will advise on the project to support the integration of municipal resiliency plans and their related adaptation and mitigation measures into the program. Teen participants will share their learning with the Chicago community through interactions with public visitors in the Museum, programs at Chicago Public Library branches, and MSI’s teen science program broadcast on Chicago’s public access TV station. Teen facilitated experiences will be tailored for SOS® experiences at MSI. The project will revise content for use in 100 after-school science clubs for students from diverse communities across the Chicago area. Further dissemination to three regional science center partners equipped with SOS® technology (Boonshoft Museum of Discovery in Dayton, Ohio; Science Central in Fort Wayne, Indiana; and Hawthorn Hollow in Kenosha, Wisconsin) will build a foundation of knowledge and resources to adapt materials to meet the needs of their communities and consider how their vulnerabilities and resiliency plans may differ from Chicago.

Competition: 2016: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Hazards
Award Number: 
NA16SEC0080001
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2016 to 09/30/2020
PI: 
Mr. Marvin McClure
State: Illinois   County: Cook   District: IL02 
Partners:   Dayton Society of Natural History / Boonshoft Museum of Discovery, Science Central, National Sea Grant College Program / University of Illinois, Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP), Chicago Public Library (CPL), Chicago Access Network Television (CAN TV), Hawthorn Hollow Nature Sanctuary & Arboretum, Loyola University, Moraine Valley Community College, NOAA Regional Climate Center / Midwestern Regional Climate Center, City of Chicago, City of Chicago / Chicago Park District Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago

Preparing Norfolk Area Students for America’s Second Highest Sea Level Rise

Funding: 
$497,774
Year: 
2016

Children in the Norfolk, Va., area will inherit the highest sea level rise on the East Coast, second to New Orleans. In response, the non-profit Elizabeth River Project educated 25,333 students, 2,586 teachers, 63 Youth Resilience Leaders and 5 NEW River Ambassadors through a high school Youth Conservation Intern program for at-risk students. In addition, 180 River Star Schools and 13 new Resilient River Star Schools were recognized for implementing environmental projects addressing restoration, conservation, flooding and reducing their carbon footprint.

Children in the Norfolk, Va., area will inherit the highest sea level rise on the East Coast, second to New Orleans. In response, the non-profit Elizabeth River Project educated 25,333 students, 2,586 teachers, 63 Youth Resilience Leaders and 5 NEW River Ambassadors through a high school Youth Conservation Intern program for at-risk students. In addition, 180 River Star Schools and 13 new Resilient River Star Schools were recognized for implementing environmental projects addressing restoration, conservation, flooding and reducing their carbon footprint. The Elizabeth River Project prepared one of the first comprehensive youth education programs on resilience on this coast. The Elizabeth River Project, working since 1993 to restore the environmental health of the urban Elizabeth River, deployed its Dominion Energy Learning Barge, “America’s Greenest Vessel,” and its new urban park, Paradise Creek Nature Park, to empower K-12 students over three years to become informed decision makers and environmental stewards, prepared to adapt to rising seas. The project reached under-served schools in Norfolk and adjoining Portsmouth, Virginia. The lead science partner was Old Dominion University, on the forefront of climate change research and the University of Virginia for evaluation of education programs. Other partners included the Chrysler Museum of Art, ground zero for street flooding that has become routine in Norfolk. Elizabeth River Project’s first Youth Resilient Strategy Resilient Youth – South Hampton Roads A Pioneer Strategy of Hope and Action to Prepare Those Who Will Inherit Rising Seas. This plan is the first in America to call on educators, both in our schools and in the community, to help our youth prepare to inherit these extraordinary and increasing challenges. The youth plan will complement Norfolk Resilient City, a call to adults to prepare for rising seas and related challenges with a vision for our children to become hopeful, resilient leaders who innovate and persevere to safeguard our community as our lives change with a changing environment. The Elizabeth River Project will also serve as the Clearing House for education resources, activities and curriculum related to resilience as we launch a Youth Resilient Educators page at www.elizabethriver.org. Additional partners included: City of Norfolk Resilience Office, Norfolk and Portsmouth Public Schools, Wetland Watch and Hampton Roads Sanitation District.

Competition: 2016: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Hazards
Award Number: 
NA16SEC0080002
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2016 to 09/30/2019
PI: 
Ms. Robin Dunbar
State: Virginia   County: Portsmouth City   District: VA03 
Partners:   Old Dominion University (ODU), National Maritime Center (TNMC) Nauticus Museum, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL), Groundwork Hudson Valley, NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office, NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Wakefield, VA Forecast Office, The Chrysler Museum of Art, City of Norfolk, Hampton Roads Sanitation District (HRSD), Norfolk Public Schools / Chesterfield Academy, Portsmouth Public Schools, Wetlands Watch, National Sea Grant College Program / Virginia Institute of Marine Science, University of Virginia, City of Portsmouth, Norfolk Public Schools, Solar Services, Inc., Chesapeake Public Schools, Girl Scout Council of Colonial Coast (GSCCC), Virginia Zoo Norfolk Botanical Garden

Recharge the Rain: Community Resilience through STEM Education

Funding: 
$498,575
Year: 
2016

Recharge the Rain moves sixth through twelfth grade teachers, students and the public through a continuum from awareness, to knowledge gain, to conceptual understanding, to action; building community resiliency to hazards associated with increased temperatures, drought and flooding in Arizona. Watershed Management Group with Arizona Project WET will utilize NOAA assets and experts from the National Weather Service and Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) to inform citizens and galvanize their commitment to building a community, resilient to the effects of a warming climate.

Recharge the Rain moves sixth through twelfth grade teachers, students and the public through a continuum from awareness, to knowledge gain, to conceptual understanding, to action; building community resiliency to hazards associated with increased temperatures, drought and flooding in Arizona. Watershed Management Group with Arizona Project WET will utilize NOAA assets and experts from the National Weather Service and Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) to inform citizens and galvanize their commitment to building a community, resilient to the effects of a warming climate. Project activities will be informed by Pima County’s hazard mitigation plan and planning tools related to preparing for and responding to flooding and extreme heat. Starting January 2017, this four-year project will 1) develop curriculum with Tucson-area teachers that incorporates systems-thinking and increases understanding of earth systems, weather and climate, and the engineering design of rainwater harvesting systems 2) immerse students in a curricular unit that results in the implementation of 8 teacher/student-led schoolyard water harvesting projects, 3) train community docents in water harvesting practices and citizen-science data collection, 4) involve Tucson community members in water harvesting principles through project implementation workshops, special events, and tours, and 5) expand program to incorporate curriculum use in Phoenix-area teachers’ classrooms and 6) finalize a replicable model for other communities facing similar threats. Environmental and community resiliency depends upon an informed society to make the best social, economic, and environmental decisions. This idea is not only at the core of NOAA’s mission, but is echoed in the programs provided by Watershed Management Group and Arizona Project WET.

Competition: 2016: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Hazards
Award Number: 
NA16SEC0080003
Grant Dates: 
01/01/2017 to 06/30/2021
PI: 
Mr. Catlow Shipek
State: Arizona   County: Pima   District: AZ02 
Partners:   Arizona State University (ASU) / Consortium for Science, Policy & Outcomes, University of Arizona / Water Resources Research Center (WRRC), NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Tucson, AZ Weather Forecast Office, University of Arizona / waterWRLD, University of Arizona / College of Agriculture & Life Sciences / Arizona Project WET, University of Arizona / Department of Soil, Water and Environmental Science, NOAA National Ocean Service (NOS) / NOAA Planet Stewards, University of Arizona / Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS), City of Tucson / Tucson Water Department, Sunnyside Unified School District / STAR Academic High School, CITY Center for Collaborative Learning / City High School, Catalina Foothills Unified District / Esperero Canyon Middle School, Santa Cruz Catholic School Tucson Unified School District / Drachman Montessori K-8 Magnet School

Resilient Schools Consortium (RiSC) Program

Funding: 
$498,570
Year: 
2016

Brooklyn College, working with NWF Eco-Schools USA, will create The Resilient Schools Consortium (RiSC) Program that increases environmental literacy while engaging high school and middle school students in climate resilience planning and practice in New York City (NYC). The City's long-term planning document, OneNYC, sets forth a vision for a resilient city without specifying a role for students or including specific plans for their schools. This project addresses this gap by developing resilience plans for NYC schools and including student voices in the process.

Brooklyn College, working with NWF Eco-Schools USA, will create The Resilient Schools Consortium (RiSC) Program that increases environmental literacy while engaging high school and middle school students in climate resilience planning and practice in New York City (NYC). The City's long-term planning document, OneNYC, sets forth a vision for a resilient city without specifying a role for students or including specific plans for their schools. This project addresses this gap by developing resilience plans for NYC schools and including student voices in the process. Student RiSC teams at NYC public schools in Brooklyn impacted by Hurricane Sandy will utilize a new Climate RiSC Curriculum based on science from the National Climate Assessment and other NOAA resources to explore the vulnerability of their schools and neighborhoods to climate change, variability and extreme weather. The RiSC teams will follow a resilience assessment process modeled after the NOAA Community Resilience Index to develop resilience projects for their schools and neighborhoods. These Students will then present their resilience plans to NYC Department of Education officials and representatives from the NYC's Office of Resilience and Recovery at RiSC Summits coordinated with the Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay. The RiSC Program and Climate RiSC Curriculum will be integrated into National Wildlife Federation's Eco-Schools USA program and disseminated nationally through the networks of the project partners.

Competition: 2016: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Hazards
Award Number: 
NA16SEC0080004
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2016 to 03/31/2021
PI: 
Dr. Brett Branco
State: New York   County: Kings   District: NY09 
Partners:   New York City (NYC) Department of Education (DOE), NOAA Climate Program Office (CPO), National Sea Grant College Program / New York Sea Grant College Program, New York City Public Schools / John Dewey High School, New York City Public Schools / Rachel Carson High School for Coastal Studies, New York City Public Schools / Edward R. Murrow High School, New York City Public Schools / IS 228 David A. Boody, New York City Public Schools / IS 281 Joseph B.Cavallaro, New York City Public Schools / Mark Twain I.S. 239, Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay (SRI@JB), National Wildlife Federation (NWF) / Northeast Regional Center, New York City Public Schools / J.H.S. 088 Peter Rouget, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) New York City Public Schools / J.H.S. 223 The Montauk

Sound Resilience-Get on Board!

Funding: 
$484,955
Year: 
2016

The Maritime Aquarium at Norwalk is located at the mouth of the Norwalk River where it flows into Long Island Sound. Its mission is to inspire people to appreciate and protect the Sound and the global environment. Over the past decade, a large percentage of the region’s 23 million people living within 50 miles of the Sound were directly affected by severe weather events, providing a timely opportunity to educate students, teachers and the public about community resilience.

The Maritime Aquarium at Norwalk is located at the mouth of the Norwalk River where it flows into Long Island Sound. Its mission is to inspire people to appreciate and protect the Sound and the global environment. Over the past decade, a large percentage of the region’s 23 million people living within 50 miles of the Sound were directly affected by severe weather events, providing a timely opportunity to educate students, teachers and the public about community resilience. In a three-year program, the Maritime Aquarium will deliver education related to environmental hazards, resilience, and the underlying science to schools from ten towns along or near Connecticut’s coast, including eight in the Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Draft 2016-2021 for Southwestern Connecticut. In these towns as in many coastal regions, the most significant environmental threats are related to the nexus of land and water. To reflect that nexus, education will occur both in the classroom and on the water, aboard the Aquarium’s hybrid-electric research vessel, Spirit of the Sound. An exhibit featuring NOAA assets related to threats and resilience will also build environmental literacy as it engages Aquarium visitors. The project will be supported by an advisory board of local educators, planning and emergency management officials, representatives from Connecticut Sea Grant, the Connecticut Institute for Resilience and Climate Adaptation and the Western Connecticut Council of Governments.

Competition: 2016: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Hazards
Award Number: 
NA16SEC0080005
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2016 to 09/30/2020
PI: 
Mr. Thomas Naiman
State: Connecticut   County: Fairfield   District: CT04 
Partners:   NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM), National Sea Grant College Program / University of Connecticut, University of Connecticut / Connecticut Institute for Resilience and Climate Adaptation (CIRCA), Western Connecticut Council of Governments (WestCOG), Stamford Public Schools, Bridgeport Public Schools, City of Bridgeport, Norwalk Fire Department, City of Stamford, Fairfield Fire Department, Norwalk River Watershed Initiative (NRWI), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) / Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Norwalk Public Schools State of Connecticut / Department of Economic and Community Development

Community Partnership for Resilience

Funding: 
$481,110
Year: 
2017

The New England Aquarium will work with the Metropolitan Area Planning Council to establish Community Partnerships for Resilience (CPR), which will create community partnerships in three Boston-area communities that face severe risk from a changing climate – Chelsea, Hull, and Lynn, Massachusetts. CPR will facilitate ‘Community Teams’ of local professionals with diverse and relevant expertise in climate science, engineering, community planning and community action, and representatives from local schools or school-based educational programs serving youth in grades 4 through 8.

The New England Aquarium will work with the Metropolitan Area Planning Council to establish Community Partnerships for Resilience (CPR), which will create community partnerships in three Boston-area communities that face severe risk from a changing climate – Chelsea, Hull, and Lynn, Massachusetts. CPR will facilitate ‘Community Teams’ of local professionals with diverse and relevant expertise in climate science, engineering, community planning and community action, and representatives from local schools or school-based educational programs serving youth in grades 4 through 8. Each team will identify the most critical, climate-related issues for their area that would benefit from public involvement and understanding. Then they will inform the design of learning activities and youth-focused climate resilience toolkits; serve as resources for teachers and students; and facilitate student-led projects to engage parents, peers, and other community members. Students themselves represent a key constituency – they will be most directly impacted by future changes and they will need civic capacity to foster positive change. Project evaluation will assess student learning and indicators of community engagement to provide both formative feedback and summative assessment of the project impacts.

Competition: 2016: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Hazards
Award Number: 
NA17SEC0080001
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2017 to 09/30/2020
PI: 
Ms. Rebekah Stendahl
State: Massachusetts   County: Suffolk   District: MA08 
Partners:   Girls Incorporated of Lynn, Museum of Science Boston, NOAA Climate Program Office (CPO), Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM), Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), Harwood Institute, City of Chelsea / Planning & Development Department, Chelsea Public Schools, Hull Public Schools, Town of Hull / Community Development & Planning Department, National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) / Greater Atlantic, Barr Foundation, University of Massachusetts Boston / School for the Environment, City of Lynn / Public Health Division, Lynn Public Schools, GreenRoots, Hull Lifesaving Museum (HLM) Neighbor to Neighbor (Lynn)

AMS/NOAA Cooperative Program for Earth System Education (CPESE)

Funding: 
$1,609,799
Year: 
2017

The American Meteorological Society (AMS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) work together to share knowledge and information about weather and climate, ocean, and coasts with educators and students across the country. The goal of this effort is to build a scientifically informed and engaged society and a diverse STEM workforce prepared to respond to environmental hazards.

The American Meteorological Society (AMS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) work together to share knowledge and information about weather and climate, ocean, and coasts with educators and students across the country. The goal of this effort is to build a scientifically informed and engaged society and a diverse STEM workforce prepared to respond to environmental hazards. AMS facilitates a national offering of the DataStreme Atmosphere and DataStreme Ocean courses and supports Project ATMOSPHERE leadership training workshops at the National Weather Service Training Center for in-service K-12 educators, with focus on those at schools with considerable numbers of students underrepresented in STEM. By 2023, about 2,100 educators will earn graduate credits through a partnership with California University of Pennsylvania and become confident Earth science educators. These educators are expected to impact more than 20,000 additional educators and several hundred thousand K-12 students.

Competition: 2017: Cooperative Program for Atmospheric Sciences Education
Award Number: 
NA17SEC0080003
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2017 to 09/30/2022
PI: 
Ms. Wendy Abshire
State: Massachusetts   County: Suffolk   District: MA08 
Partners:   Consortium for Ocean Leadership, NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) / National Centers for Environmental Prediction, NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Grand Rapids, MI Forecast Office, California University of Pennsylvania (CalU), NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Training Center, NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Quad Cities, Iowa Forecast Office, NOAA National Ocean Service (NOS) / NOAA Planet Stewards, American Geosciences Institute (AGI), American Institute of Physics (AIP), Lockheed Martin Corporation, National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters / NASA Disasters Program, GLOBE Program, NASA Headquarters / NASA Disasters Program, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) / Unidata National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA)

Pages