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Preparing Norfolk Area Students for America’s Second Highest Sea Level Rise

Funding: 
$497,774
Year: 
2016

Children in the Norfolk, Va., area will inherit the highest sea level rise on the East Coast, second to New Orleans. In response, the non-profit Elizabeth River Project educated 25,333 students, 2,586 teachers, 63 Youth Resilience Leaders and 5 NEW River Ambassadors through a high school Youth Conservation Intern program for at-risk students. In addition, 180 River Star Schools and 13 new Resilient River Star Schools were recognized for implementing environmental projects addressing restoration, conservation, flooding and reducing their carbon footprint.

Children in the Norfolk, Va., area will inherit the highest sea level rise on the East Coast, second to New Orleans. In response, the non-profit Elizabeth River Project educated 25,333 students, 2,586 teachers, 63 Youth Resilience Leaders and 5 NEW River Ambassadors through a high school Youth Conservation Intern program for at-risk students. In addition, 180 River Star Schools and 13 new Resilient River Star Schools were recognized for implementing environmental projects addressing restoration, conservation, flooding and reducing their carbon footprint. The Elizabeth River Project prepared one of the first comprehensive youth education programs on resilience on this coast. The Elizabeth River Project, working since 1993 to restore the environmental health of the urban Elizabeth River, deployed its Dominion Energy Learning Barge, “America’s Greenest Vessel,” and its new urban park, Paradise Creek Nature Park, to empower K-12 students over three years to become informed decision makers and environmental stewards, prepared to adapt to rising seas. The project reached under-served schools in Norfolk and adjoining Portsmouth, Virginia. The lead science partner was Old Dominion University, on the forefront of climate change research and the University of Virginia for evaluation of education programs. Other partners included the Chrysler Museum of Art, ground zero for street flooding that has become routine in Norfolk. Elizabeth River Project’s first Youth Resilient Strategy Resilient Youth – South Hampton Roads A Pioneer Strategy of Hope and Action to Prepare Those Who Will Inherit Rising Seas. This plan is the first in America to call on educators, both in our schools and in the community, to help our youth prepare to inherit these extraordinary and increasing challenges. The youth plan will complement Norfolk Resilient City, a call to adults to prepare for rising seas and related challenges with a vision for our children to become hopeful, resilient leaders who innovate and persevere to safeguard our community as our lives change with a changing environment. The Elizabeth River Project will also serve as the Clearing House for education resources, activities and curriculum related to resilience as we launch a Youth Resilient Educators page at www.elizabethriver.org. Additional partners included: City of Norfolk Resilience Office, Norfolk and Portsmouth Public Schools, Wetland Watch and Hampton Roads Sanitation District.

Competition: 2016: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Hazards
Award Number: 
NA16SEC0080002
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2016 to 09/30/2019
PI: 
Ms. Robin Dunbar
State: Virginia   County: Portsmouth City   District: VA03 
Partners:   Old Dominion University (ODU), National Maritime Center (TNMC) Nauticus Museum, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL), Groundwork Hudson Valley, NOAA Chesapeake Bay Office, NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Wakefield, VA Forecast Office, The Chrysler Museum of Art, City of Norfolk, Hampton Roads Sanitation District (HRSD), Norfolk Public Schools / Chesterfield Academy, Portsmouth Public Schools, Wetlands Watch, National Sea Grant College Program / Virginia Institute of Marine Science, University of Virginia, City of Portsmouth, Norfolk Public Schools, Solar Services, Inc., Chesapeake Public Schools, Girl Scout Council of Colonial Coast (GSCCC), Virginia Zoo Norfolk Botanical Garden

From Mt. Rainier to the Pacific Coast: Fostering Resilient Climate Leaders, Communities and Coastal Ecosystems

Funding: 
$298,713
Year: 
2015

Nisqually River Foundation with partners (South Sound GREEN, Chehalis Basin Education Consortium, and Mount Rainier Institute) with support from NOAA Fisheries’ West Coast Region implemented their project, “From Mt. Rainier to the Pacific Coast: Fostering Resilient Climate Leaders, Communities and Coastal Ecosystems,” over 3 years, from 2016-2018. Our region faces the climate change threats of sea level rise, receding glaciers, extreme weather/flooding, ocean acidification and impacts on humans and important local resources, such as surface and groundwater, salmon, forests, and shellfish.

Nisqually River Foundation with partners (South Sound GREEN, Chehalis Basin Education Consortium, and Mount Rainier Institute) with support from NOAA Fisheries’ West Coast Region implemented their project, “From Mt. Rainier to the Pacific Coast: Fostering Resilient Climate Leaders, Communities and Coastal Ecosystems,” over 3 years, from 2016-2018. Our region faces the climate change threats of sea level rise, receding glaciers, extreme weather/flooding, ocean acidification and impacts on humans and important local resources, such as surface and groundwater, salmon, forests, and shellfish. Together we engaged more than 120 teachers and their 3,000+ students from the Nisqually, South Puget Sound and Chehalis watersheds to understand and predict changes in climate, weather, oceans, and coasts. We held three Summer Teachers Institutes to bring teachers connect teachers with local science experts in climate change impacts in the Pacific Northwest. Our 2017 Institute was held in partnership with Mount Rainier Institute, who also hosted Climate Resilient Youth Leadership Programs for 350 12-18-year olds. Participants generated and participated in Community Resilience Action Projects to conserve local ecosystems and increase resiliency in their communities to extreme weather events and changing climate. These projects included: riparian habitat restoration in the Nisqually, Chehalis, and Deschutes basins; creating recycling and composting programs on school campuses; eliminating Styrofoam from school cafeterias; creating a Migration Parade event to explore climate impacts on migratory species; the “Pick a DOT- Do One Thing - What’s your thing?” on-line videos; and the creation of high-impact environmental education art installations, to name a handful. Students also monitored local stream flows, temperatures, and water quality, building on a previous Targeted Watershed Grant from the EPA and a data set that goes back to 1992. NOAA’s mission of Service was supported as teachers and students shared their knowledge in their classrooms, with school districts, at community meetings, and through social media. NOAA assets used included the NW Marine Fisheries staff, Data in the Classroom, CoCoRaHS, NOAA-NASA Cloud Watcher Chart, NOAA’s Climate Literacy Principles, Beat the Uncertainty game, Game of Floods, Thermal Expansion label, the Marine Mammals of the US West Coast, and more. Other local contributing partners include the Nisqually Indian Tribe, the Squaxin Tribe, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Nisqually Land Trust, Thurston Conservation District and Capital Region Educational Service District 113.

Competition: 2015: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Changes
Award Number: 
NA15SEC0080007
Grant Dates: 
04/01/2016 to 07/31/2019
PI: 
Mr. Justin Hall
State: Washington   County: Thurston   District: WA10 
Partners:   National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) / West Coast, Chehalis Basin Education Consortium, South Sound GREEN (Global Rivers Environmental Education Network), Mount Rainier Institute, U.S. National Park Service / Mount Rainier National Park, Nisqually Land Trust, Capitol Land Trust, Chehalis River Basin Land Trust, NOAA Office of Education, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service / Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge, Nisqually Tribe, Joint Base Lewis–McChord, Mason Conservation District, Squaxin Island Tribe Puget Sound Estuarium

Promoting Environmental Literacy through Teacher Professional Development Workshops and Climate Change Student Summits (C2S2)

Funding: 
$696,672
Year: 
2009

This project will provide K-12 teacher professional development and focused student activities to promote environmental literacy using the essential principles of ocean and climate literacy.

This project will provide K-12 teacher professional development and focused student activities to promote environmental literacy using the essential principles of ocean and climate literacy. In partnerships with NOAA entities, school districts, and museums across the United States, we will provide: (1) high-energy face-to-face professional development workshops for teachers, facilitated by experienced educators; (2) ongoing support and interactions among teachers and students through an online collaborative website, or group-hub; and, (3) high-profile, focused events in which students interact with scientists and the public to share what they've learned, both locally and internationally. The primary goal of this project is to increase the environmental literacy of K-12 teachers and their students from school districts that are part of existing science museum networks. Each summer, we will work with 4 to 6 partner museums to invite 30 to 40 teachers from their local school districts to take part in a pair of workshops.

Competition: 2008/2009: ELG for Formal K-12 Education
Award Number: 
NA09SEC4690009
Grant Dates: 
09/01/2009 to 12/31/2013
PI: 
Dr. Frank Rack
State: Nebraska   County: Lancaster   District: NE01 
Partners:   Museum of Science and Industry, Technical Education Research Centers / TERC, Birch Aquarium at Scripps, California State University, San Marcos, Virginia Tech / College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Grossmont College, Hardin Public Schools 17-H&1, Little Big Horn College, Oak Park Unified School District, Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium, San Diego Unified School District, Anchorage School District (ASD), Bureau of Land Management (BLM) / Campbell Creek Science Center, Carteret County Public School System, Montana State University / Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences (LRES), North Carolina Maritime Museum, Northern Illinois University / Department of Geology and Environmental Geosciences, University of Alaska (UA-Anchorage)/ Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alaska Southeast (UAS), University of Alaska (UA-Fairbanks), University of California at Santa Barbara, University of Michigan / Museum of Natural History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) / Institute of Marine Science, University of Washington (UW) / School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences (SAFS), Virginia Tech / Biocomplexity Institute University of Michigan / Earth and Environmental Sciences