NOAA welcomes the 2022 NOAA scholars!

NOAA Office of Education has selected 127 Ernest F. Hollings undergraduate scholars and 12 José E. Serrano Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI) undergraduate scholars for the classes of 2022. Scholars receive a two-year academic scholarship for their junior and senior years, paid summer internship opportunities, and funding to participate in two national scientific conferences.

Ten young adults in business casual clothing pose outside.
The 2022 class of EPP/MSI scholars during their scholarship orientation. From left to right, Christian Schnell, Courtney White, Martin Gonzalez, Alison Novara, Ingrid Martinson, Kiah Matthews, Michaela Wong, Hailey Poole, Richarde Graham II, and Alexandria Tennant. (Elvis Efamba/Office of Education)

“Congratulations to the 2022 class of NOAA scholars! We are delighted to welcome them to our team of extraordinary individuals who advance NOAA’s mission of science, service, and stewardship,” said Louisa Koch, Director of NOAA Education.

This year, 704 applications were submitted for these two competitive scholarships. The selected applicants of both NOAA undergraduate scholarship programs come from a total of 84 different campuses in 33 U.S. states and Washington, D.C.

The 2022 EPP/MSI undergraduate scholars finished their two-week orientation on June 2, 2022, and began their first of two summer internships on June 6, 2022. The Hollings undergraduate scholars attended their virtual orientation from May 31-June 2, 2022, and will complete their internships during the summer of 2023. 

Nadya holds a crab in one hand and uses calipers in the other to measure the width of the body. She is sitting at a lab bench with other measurement tools, including forceps and a plastic weighing boat.
2020 Hollings scholar Nadya Gutierrez measures a marsh crab collected at Northern Inlet-Winyah Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve during her 2021 summer internship. This photo was taken during a time when indoor masks were not required for vaccinated individuals in University of South Carolina facilities. (Maggie Pelton)

At the beginning of the virtual orientation, scholars were welcomed by NOAA Administrator Rick Spinrad, Ph.D. Dr. Spinrad shared unique career paths of a few NOAA leaders and spoke about the importance of opportunities like those afforded by EPP/MSI and Hollings undergraduate scholarships for any career. “The education and experiences that you’re receiving through these programs are going to give you extraordinary opportunities wherever you want to take your careers,” said Dr. Spinrad. During orientation, scholars also learned about the role each of NOAA’s line offices play in executing NOAA’s mission, student and early career opportunities in each line office, and what to expect in the next two years as a NOAA scholar. 

The education and experiences that you’re receiving through these programs are going to give you extraordinary opportunities wherever you want to take your careers.

Dr. Rick Spinrad, NOAA Administrator

At the start of orientation, the scholars expressed their excitement about being a NOAA scholar. While a NOAA internship itself is a highlight for many scholars, they also look forward to growing their professional networks, gaining confidence as researchers and other professionals, learning specific techniques, honing their presentation skills, and connecting with peers who share their enthusiasm for science and stewardship. 

Samuel, a Hollings Scholar, swims in snorkeling gear near to the water's surface against a background of rock and corals. The leg of a second snorkeler can be seen as the person swims out of the shot.
Samuel Koeck snorkels in Kāneʻohe Bay to collect collector urchins (Tripneustes gratilla) for his 2021 Hollings summer internship with He‘eia National Estuarine Research Reserve. (Courtesy of Sam Koeck)

Though the students have a lot to gain from their scholarships, Office of Education Deputy Director Christos Michalopoulos concluded orientation by reminding the scholars that they will have a lasting impact on NOAA as well. “I’m confident that you will have a real, significant, and positive impact during your time at NOAA,” said Christos.

The scholarship application period for the class of 2023 opens on September 1, 2022, and will close on January 31, 2023.


Scholarship recipients

EPP/MSI undergraduate scholars

 
state name university

CA

Ingrid Martinson

California State University, Monterey Bay

CA

Tatyana Villela

California State University, Monterey Bay

CA

Martin Gonzalez

University of California, Santa Cruz

FL

Alison Novara

Nova Southeastern University

FL

Courtney White

Nova Southeastern University

FL

Kiah Matthews

Nova Southeastern University

GA

Alexandria Tennant

Savannah State University

HI

Michaela Wong

University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo

HI

Spencer Sakuma

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

NC

Hailey Poole

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

NC

Richarde Graham II

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

TX

Christian Schnell

University of the Incarnate Word

2022-2024 EPP/MSI Undergraduate Scholarship Program profiles.

Ernest F. Hollings undergraduate scholars

state name university

AK

Hope Calogero

Alaska Pacific University

AK

Kellianne Kincannon

University of Alaska Southeast

AL

Anika Cho

The University of Alabama

AL

Kittson Hamill

The University of Alabama

AZ

Dylan Girone

University of Arizona

CA

Megan Robertson

California Institute of Technology

CA

Roxanne Mina

California Maritime Academy

CA

Jad Aljersh

California State University, Northridge

CA

Lacy Smith

California State University, Monterey Bay

CA

William Yik

Harvey Mudd College

CA

Ryan Ursíny

San Diego State University

CA

Kanoe Aiu

Stanford University

CA

Britney Wu

University of California, Berkeley

CA

Hassan Shaikh

University of California, Irvine

CA

Allison Yan

University of California, Los Angeles

CA

Hannah Hunter

University of California, Los Angeles

CA

Tatum Delaney

University of California, Los Angeles

CA

Maxwell Lyons

University of California, San Diego

CA

Cameron Penn

University of California, Santa Barbara

CA

Isabella Garfield

University of California, Santa Cruz

CA

Justine Mcouat

University of California, Santa Cruz

CO

Emmelia Ashton

Colorado School of Mines

CT

Devan Barnum

University of Connecticut

CT

Grace Cajski

Yale University

CT

Immanuel Bissell

Yale University

DC

Nyeema Caldwell

Howard University

DC

Ashley Hocking

The American University

DC

Trevaughn Ellis

The American University

FL

Gracelyn Ham

Eckerd College

FL

Madelynne Reifsteck

Eckerd College

FL

Makayla Neldner

Eckerd College

FL

Ethan Graham

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

FL

Kevin Rodriguez

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

FL

Hanna McDaniel

Florida State University

FL

Diego Rivera

University of Florida

FL

Meredith Anderson

University of Florida

FL

Alexandra Redford

University of Miami

FL

Brooke Weiser

University of Miami

FL

Laura Jones

University of Miami

FL

Mathew Birtman

University of Miami

FL

Nicholas Forcone

University of Miami

FL

Abigail Reed

University of South Florida

FL

Danya Awshah

University of South Florida

GA

Nicholas Chang

Emory University

GA

Kelly Neighbour

University of Georgia

GA

Max White

University of Georgia

GA

Tereza Mrazek

University of Georgia

HI

Abigail Lewine

University of Hawaii at Hilo

HI

Quintin Allen

University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo

HI

Akili Ligons

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

HI

Mariko Quinn

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

HI

Sonja Giardina

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

IA

Sayre Satterwhite

University of Iowa

IL

Gabriella Ballestas

Triton College

IL

Jared Stickney

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

IN

Clayton Glasgow

University of Notre Dame

IN

Anna Crumbacher

Valparaiso University

KY

Adjete Tekoe

Western Kentucky University

LA

Ria Salway

Louisiana State University

MA

Seraina Rioult-Pedotti

Bristol Community College

MA

Maria Geogdzhayeva

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MA

Lorelei Ing

Smith College

MA

Austin Rebello

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

MD

Tochi Iwuji

Coppin State College

MD

Alana Ginsburg

University of Maryland, College Park

MD

Courtney Deloatch-Hill

University of Maryland, College Park

MD

Daniel Oberholtzer

University of Maryland, College Park

MD

Jason Manzon

University of Maryland, College Park

MD

Jonah Pereyra

University of Maryland, College Park

MD

Maguire Ballard

University of Maryland, College Park

ME

Sophia Chivers

College of the Atlantic

MI

Cassidy Beach

University of Michigan

MN

Gweneth Lau

University of Minnesota Duluth

MN

Manashree Padiyath

University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

NC

Emily Nagamoto

Duke University

NC

Jessica Lipschultz

Duke University

NC

Dylan Major

University of North Carolina at Asheville

NC

Caitlin O'Brien

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

NC

Emma Rudy Srebnik

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

NC

Diandre' Richie

University of North Carolina at Wilmington

NH

Lauren McDowell

University of New Hampshire

NJ

David Ban

Princeton University

NY

Eojin Lee

Columbia University

NY

Kate Laboda

Fordham University

NY

Christopher Gilberti

State University of New York at Albany

NY

Emma Liptrap

Syracuse University

OH

Nick Beltramini

Oberlin College

OH

Ricarda Hill

Oberlin College

OH

Shira Presberg

Oberlin College

OH

Ashlee Ziegler

Ohio University

OK

Savannah Southward

University of Oklahoma

PA

Isabel Thornberry

Haverford College

PA

Matthew Teare

Millersville University of Pennsylvania

PA

Michael Zettlemoyer

Millersville University of Pennsylvania

PA

Christian Spallone

Penn State University Park

PA

Maxwell Katsouros

Penn State University Park

PA

Jonathan Tran

University of Pennsylvania

PA

Noah French

University of Pittsburgh

RI

Lorenzo Davidson

Brown University

RI

Alexandra Sinno

University of Rhode Island

RI

Ellie Madigan

University of Rhode Island

RI

Kara James

University of Rhode Island

RI

Maricarmen Serna

University of Rhode Island

RI

Matthew Brander

University of Rhode Island

RI

Molly Halla

University of Rhode Island

RI

Taya Clements

University of Rhode Island

RI

Zoe Scipioni

University of Rhode Island

SC

Haley Durbin

University of South Carolina

SC

Jasmine Witt

University of South Carolina

SC

Sarah Elliott

University of South Carolina

SC

Sydney Staines

University of South Carolina

SC

Weston Watts

University of South Carolina

TX

Christian Pryor

Texas A&M University at Galveston

TX

Austin Willson

Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

TX

Abigail Fritz

University of Dallas

VA

Derek Sprincis

University of Virginia

VA

Isabella Dressel

University of Virginia

VA

Madeline Kronebusch

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

VT

Spencer Welsh

Middlebury College

WA

Willow Jackson

Bellevue Community College

WA

Isaac Olson

University of Washington

WA

Jonathan Kwong

University of Washington

WA

Leighna Sugimoto

University of Washington

WA

Madeline Hansen

University of Washington

WA

Nicole Reynolds

University of Washington

WA

Sarah Hensley

University of Washington

WI

Eleanor Meng

Lawrence University

About the scholarship programs

Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship

The Ernest F. Hollings Undergraduate Scholarship was established in 2005 in honor of Senator Ernest F. Hollings, who was well known for supporting ocean policy and conservation. The Hollings Scholarship includes a two-year academic award of $9,500 per year, and a 10-week, full-time, paid summer internship opportunity at any NOAA facility nationwide. Scholars also receive funding to present their NOAA research projects at two national scientific conferences. Students apply in their second year of undergraduate study and each must be a full-time undergraduate majoring in a NOAA mission field such as oceanic, environmental, biological, and atmospheric sciences, mathematics, engineering, remote sensing technology, physical sciences, social sciences, and teacher education.

José E. Serrano Educational Partnership Program Undergraduate Scholarship

The Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions (EPP/MSI) was established in 2000 to support the education of postsecondary students pursuing degrees that directly support NOAA’s mission. In 2019, Congress renamed the program as the José E. Serrano Educational Partnership Program in honor of Congressman Serrano. The EPP/MSI Undergraduate Scholarship includes a two-year academic award of $9,500 per year, and two summer internship opportunities. Scholars also receive funds to present the results of their NOAA research projects at two national conferences. Students must attend a minority serving institution, have and maintain a 3.2 or higher GPA and a declared major in a NOAA-mission related discipline including, but not limited to, oceanic, environmental, biological, and atmospheric sciences, mathematics, engineering, remote sensing technology, physical sciences, including physics, geography and hydrology as well as social sciences.


Contact:

NOAA Office of Education

1315 East West Hwy SSMC 3 / Rm 10734

Silver Spring, MD 20910

For the Ernest F. Hollings Undergraduate Scholarship, please email studentscholarshipprograms@noaa.gov

For the Educational Partnership Program with Minority Serving Institutions Undergraduate Scholarship, please email epp.usp@noaa.gov