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From Mt. Rainier to the Pacific Coast: Fostering Resilient Climate Leaders, Communities and Coastal Ecosystems

Funding: 
$298,713
Year: 
2015

Nisqually River Foundation with partners (South Sound GREEN, Chehalis Basin Education Consortium, and Mount Rainier Institute) with support from NOAA Fisheries’ West Coast Region implemented their project, “From Mt. Rainier to the Pacific Coast: Fostering Resilient Climate Leaders, Communities and Coastal Ecosystems,” over 3 years, from 2016-2018. Our region faces the climate change threats of sea level rise, receding glaciers, extreme weather/flooding, ocean acidification and impacts on humans and important local resources, such as surface and groundwater, salmon, forests, and shellfish.

Nisqually River Foundation with partners (South Sound GREEN, Chehalis Basin Education Consortium, and Mount Rainier Institute) with support from NOAA Fisheries’ West Coast Region implemented their project, “From Mt. Rainier to the Pacific Coast: Fostering Resilient Climate Leaders, Communities and Coastal Ecosystems,” over 3 years, from 2016-2018. Our region faces the climate change threats of sea level rise, receding glaciers, extreme weather/flooding, ocean acidification and impacts on humans and important local resources, such as surface and groundwater, salmon, forests, and shellfish. Together we engaged more than 120 teachers and their 3,000+ students from the Nisqually, South Puget Sound and Chehalis watersheds to understand and predict changes in climate, weather, oceans, and coasts. We held three Summer Teachers Institutes to bring teachers connect teachers with local science experts in climate change impacts in the Pacific Northwest. Our 2017 Institute was held in partnership with Mount Rainier Institute, who also hosted Climate Resilient Youth Leadership Programs for 350 12-18-year olds. Participants generated and participated in Community Resilience Action Projects to conserve local ecosystems and increase resiliency in their communities to extreme weather events and changing climate. These projects included: riparian habitat restoration in the Nisqually, Chehalis, and Deschutes basins; creating recycling and composting programs on school campuses; eliminating Styrofoam from school cafeterias; creating a Migration Parade event to explore climate impacts on migratory species; the “Pick a DOT- Do One Thing - What’s your thing?” on-line videos; and the creation of high-impact environmental education art installations, to name a handful. Students also monitored local stream flows, temperatures, and water quality, building on a previous Targeted Watershed Grant from the EPA and a data set that goes back to 1992. NOAA’s mission of Service was supported as teachers and students shared their knowledge in their classrooms, with school districts, at community meetings, and through social media. NOAA assets used included the NW Marine Fisheries staff, Data in the Classroom, CoCoRaHS, NOAA-NASA Cloud Watcher Chart, NOAA’s Climate Literacy Principles, Beat the Uncertainty game, Game of Floods, Thermal Expansion label, the Marine Mammals of the US West Coast, and more. Other local contributing partners include the Nisqually Indian Tribe, the Squaxin Tribe, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Nisqually Land Trust, Thurston Conservation District and Capital Region Educational Service District 113.

Competition: 2015: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Changes
Award Number: 
NA15SEC0080007
Grant Dates: 
04/01/2016 to 07/31/2019
PI: 
Mr. Justin Hall
State: Washington   County: Thurston   District: WA10 
Partners:   National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) / West Coast, Chehalis Basin Education Consortium, South Sound GREEN (Global Rivers Environmental Education Network), Mount Rainier Institute, U.S. National Park Service / Mount Rainier National Park, Nisqually Land Trust, Capitol Land Trust, Chehalis River Basin Land Trust, NOAA Office of Education, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service / Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge, Nisqually Tribe, Joint Base Lewis–McChord, Mason Conservation District, Squaxin Island Tribe Puget Sound Estuarium

Measuring the Effectiveness of North American Environmental Education Programs with Respect to the Parameters of Environmental Literacy

Funding: 
$288,417
Year: 
2008

The North American Association of Environmental Education (NAAEE) will assess environmental literacy levels of middle school students and compare the results to baseline data collected nationwide in 2007. In this study the research team will solicit and select a purposeful sample of schools and other program sites that represent the following categories: (1) Networks, e.g., Lieberman schools, Earth Force/Green Schools, Blue Ribbon School, etc.; (2) Programs, e.g. WET, WILD, PLT, IEEIA, etc.); (3) environmentally focused Charter and Magnet Schools; and (4) Independent Schools.

The North American Association of Environmental Education (NAAEE) will assess environmental literacy levels of middle school students and compare the results to baseline data collected nationwide in 2007. In this study the research team will solicit and select a purposeful sample of schools and other program sites that represent the following categories: (1) Networks, e.g., Lieberman schools, Earth Force/Green Schools, Blue Ribbon School, etc.; (2) Programs, e.g. WET, WILD, PLT, IEEIA, etc.); (3) environmentally focused Charter and Magnet Schools; and (4) Independent Schools. By comparing 2008 programmatic assessments to the established 2007 base-line levels of environmental literacy (while investigating the variables that may contribute to school wide or classroom levels of literacy), the field of environmental education and NOAA may make future curricular and program decisions that are grounded in sound scientific data. The Research Team will review these results and generate a report to be submitted to NOAA and NAAEE (and other partners as needed). These results comprise a presentation at the annual NAAEE Conference and other venues. Articles will be submitted to professional newsletters and journals.

Competition: 2008: National Environmental Literacy Assessment
Award Number: 
NA08SEC4690026
Grant Dates: 
01/01/2008 to 12/31/2010
PI: 
Ms. Darlene Dorsey
State: District of Columbia   County: District of Columbia   District: DC00 
Partners:   Florida Institute of Technology, University of Arkansas at Fort Smith University of Wisconsin (UW–Platteville)

Secondary Analyses of the National Environmental Literacy Assessment: Phase I & II Students, Teachers, Programs and School Survey

Funding: 
$151,699
Year: 
2012

Phase Three of the National Environmental Literacy Assessment (NELA) will analyze the relationship between middle school students' scores on the MSELS and other measured variables that may have critically impacted the development of environmental literacy in these students. Phases One and Two of the National Environmental Literacy Assessment (NELA) relied on four data collection instruments: The Middle School Environmental Literacy Survey (MSELS), the School Information Form, the Program Information Form, and the Teacher Information Form.

Phase Three of the National Environmental Literacy Assessment (NELA) will analyze the relationship between middle school students' scores on the MSELS and other measured variables that may have critically impacted the development of environmental literacy in these students. Phases One and Two of the National Environmental Literacy Assessment (NELA) relied on four data collection instruments: The Middle School Environmental Literacy Survey (MSELS), the School Information Form, the Program Information Form, and the Teacher Information Form. The primary outcomes of these phases were to identify general levels of environmental literacy (measured by the MSELS) and to compare these levels both within and across the studies. Through the comparison of these data sets, we could identify schools in which grade level cohorts of students displayed markedly higher levels of environmental literacy variables than their peer cohorts at other schools. However, questions remain concerning the magnitude and influence of variables that were reported on those survey forms, as well as the relationships among variables measured by the MSELS scales. The major research questions that will guide this Phase are: 1) To what extent do the variables measured by these Forms during Phase One and Two appear to have contributed to or influenced students' environmental literacy scores; 2) How do these variables appear to interact with each other; and 3) What are the relative contributions of knowledge, affect, and skill variables to actual commitment or behavior. The resulting analyses of this study will be shared both through peer-reviewed publications as well as appropriate professional conferences.

Competition: 2010: NOAA Broad Agency Announcement for FY 2010 - 2011
Award Number: 
NA12SEC0080018
Grant Dates: 
05/01/2012 to 04/30/2014
PI: 
Dr. William McBeth Ph.D
State: District of Columbia   County: District of Columbia   District: DC00 
Partners:   University of Wisconsin (UW–Platteville)

Carbon Networks

Funding: 
$142,718
Year: 
2014

Carbon Networks addresses the disconnect between scientific evidence and the public’s understanding of the impacts of ocean acidification and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

Carbon Networks addresses the disconnect between scientific evidence and the public’s understanding of the impacts of ocean acidification and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It brings together three diverse, informal education partners – the Exploratorium in San Francisco, the Waikiki Aquarium in Hawaii, and the Pacific Science Center in Seattle – in a collaborative project to co-design and implement professional development for staff and local educators, as well as create educational programs and activities for museum visitors to better understand the evolving narrative and impact of ocean acidification and climate change.

Competition: 2013: ELG for Building Capacity of Informal and Formal Educators
Award Number: 
NA14SEC0080001
Grant Dates: 
09/01/2014 to 08/31/2018
PI: 
Dr. Andrew Rossiter
State: Hawaii   County: Honolulu   District: HI01 
Partners:   Exploratorium, Pacific Science Center, University of California at Santa Barbara, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL), NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) / Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Channel Islands, National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Greater Farallones, National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Cordell Bank, National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Olympic Coast, U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System / CeNCOOS, University of California—Berkeley, National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Monterey Bay, U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System / PacIOOS University of California—Davis