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Raindrop: An Innovative Educational Tool for River Awareness

Funding: 
$259,770
Year: 
2010

This project will create a new educational tool for river awareness in the United States through a mobile device application called Raindrop. Raindrop traces the flow of water from the user's home location to a downstream watershed location. Raindrop is part of a larger installation named FLOW (Can You See the River?), which joins the cognitive power of science with the affective power of the arts by creating virtual and physical spaces for river awareness in the White River watershed in Indianapolis, IN.

This project will create a new educational tool for river awareness in the United States through a mobile device application called Raindrop. Raindrop traces the flow of water from the user's home location to a downstream watershed location. Raindrop is part of a larger installation named FLOW (Can You See the River?), which joins the cognitive power of science with the affective power of the arts by creating virtual and physical spaces for river awareness in the White River watershed in Indianapolis, IN. In addition to the flow path, Raindrop functionality includes watershed context and physical marker mapping, flow path water quality indicators, utilization of NOAA weather feeds and alerts, weather and climate comparisons, storm event size implications, and guidance on watershed restoration actions. Artist-designed physical markers are strategically located in the watershed to direct the virtual user to physical areas of interest.

Competition: 2010: ELG for Informal/Nonformal Education
Award Number: 
NA10SEC0080027
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2010 to 09/30/2013
PI: 
Dr. Timothy Carter
State: Indiana   County: Marion   District: IN07 
Partners:   Indianapolis Museum of Art (IMA), IUPUI's Center for Earth & Environmental Science (CEES), IUPUI's Indianapolis Mapping and Geographic Infrastructure System (IMAGIS), Marian University, City as a Living Laboratory, Office of the Mayor of Indianapolis, Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, Purdue University / Indiana State Climate Office (Iclimate), Project School, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) / Indiana Water Science Center, White River Alliance Williams Creek Consulting

Understanding the Impact of Science on a Sphere

Funding: 
$72,100
Year: 
2008

The Institute for Learning Innovation (ILI) will undertake a rigorous study of the public learning impact of the Science on a Sphere (SOS) museum education program that was began by NOAA in 2005. As proposed, this study will identify and evaluate the range and depth of SOS audience impacts and outcomes to provide the essential baseline understanding for its ongoing and future uses. The study will further explore the role and impact of data visualization in contemporary society as an effective means of deepening public understanding of such complex issues as Earth natural systems.

The Institute for Learning Innovation (ILI) will undertake a rigorous study of the public learning impact of the Science on a Sphere (SOS) museum education program that was began by NOAA in 2005. As proposed, this study will identify and evaluate the range and depth of SOS audience impacts and outcomes to provide the essential baseline understanding for its ongoing and future uses. The study will further explore the role and impact of data visualization in contemporary society as an effective means of deepening public understanding of such complex issues as Earth natural systems.

Competition: 2008: Science On a Sphere Program Evaluation
Award Number: 
NA08SEC4690057
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2008 to 03/31/2010
PI: 
Ms. Kate Haley-Goldman
State: Maryland   County: Anne Arundel   District: MD05 

The Resilient Schools Consortium (RiSC) Phase II: Connecting Schools to Coastal Communities

Funding: 
$231,987
Year: 
2020

With a three-year $450,000 grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) and partners will implement Phase II of a climate and resilience education program, The Resilient Schools Consortium: Connecting Schools to Coastal Communities. Building on the previously funded Resilient Schools Consortium (RiSC) Program, (2016 - 2019), NWF will work with 200 students and 10 teachers from eight New York City Department of Education public schools.

With a three-year $450,000 grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Wildlife Federation (NWF) and partners will implement Phase II of a climate and resilience education program, The Resilient Schools Consortium: Connecting Schools to Coastal Communities. Building on the previously funded Resilient Schools Consortium (RiSC) Program, (2016 - 2019), NWF will work with 200 students and 10 teachers from eight New York City Department of Education public schools. The students will adopt-a-shoreline in Coney Island, Brooklyn - a frontline community battered by Superstorm Sandy in 2012 and threatened by sea level rise, coastal erosion, and inequitable exposures to flooding. Through field trips to local beaches, community engagement events, dune plantings, and public art installations, this project will connect students – who live or attend school in Coney Island - to residents and community partners. Together, they will increase their awareness of future climate impacts and develop strategies for building climate resilience and equitable adaptation to sea level rise. The Phase 1 RiSC curriculum for grades 6-12, designed by NYC STEM teachers, will be streamlined into a one-year product focused on coastal hazards, natural and built solutions that increase ecological resilience, and civic participation. Adaptable by schools in other coastal communities, the curriculum will continue to offer a strong foundation in climate science. Complete with user-friendly slide decks, handouts, and direct links to NOAA resources and digital tools, it will guide teachers and students through project-based activities during the school year. Key program partners, New York Sea Grant, and American Littoral Society (ALS), and advisors from the Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay (SRIJB) will provide community science expertise and lead shoreline ecology field trips. An “Adopt-a-Shoreline Field Trip Guide” will help students monitor the shoreline. ALS will lead professional development workshops for teachers and dune-planting activities that will increase shoreline resilience. The Coney Island Beautification Project, a core community partner, will lead public engagement and outreach, and recruit residents with historical knowledge of local weather events for student interviews. Students will build sea level rise markers and install them in suitable public spaces. Culminating Open Houses will bring Coney Islanders together to view student work and provide a platform to discuss flood risks and solutions. Knology will evaluate the project’s impact.

Competition: 2020: ELG for Community Resilience to Extreme Weather Events and Environmental Hazards
Award Number: 
NA20SEC0080005
Grant Dates: 
10/01/2020 to 09/30/2023
PI: 
Ms. Emily Fano
State: New York   County: New York   District: NY10 
Partners:   National Sea Grant College Program / New York Sea Grant College Program, New York City Public Schools / John Dewey High School, New York City Public Schools / Rachel Carson High School for Coastal Studies, New York City Public Schools / IS 228 David A. Boody, Science and Resilience Institute at Jamaica Bay (SRI@JB), New York City Public Schools / J.H.S. 088 Peter Rouget, New York City Public Schools / J.H.S. 223 The Montauk, New York City Public Schools / P.S. 288 the Shirley Tanyhill, New York City Public Schools / Abraham Lincoln High School, New York City Public Schools / I.S. 303 Herbert S. Eisenburg, Regional Plan Association, Coney Island Beatification Project, Inc. American Littoral Society