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Use the filter menu and interactive map to explore the past competitions offered and grants awarded through the Environmental Literacy Program.

To learn more about project findings and outcomes, view the summaries of our grantees’ summative evaluation reports.

Climate Youth Labs (CY-Labs): Elevating Youth Voices to Promote Climate Resiliency

Twin Cities PBS offsite link · St Paul, Minnesota
Funding: $498,664
Year: 2022

Minnesota and Wisconsin communities are facing multiple climate hazards including wildfires, drought, pollution, severe storms, flooding, health emergencies, and habitat and species loss. To build a robust youth component to state climate resiliency efforts, the Climate Youth Labs (CY-Labs) project will support place-based learning about climate resiliency with 120+ middle school youth using NOAA assets and elevate their voices through a national public media podcast series for youth.

Minnesota and Wisconsin communities are facing multiple climate hazards including wildfires, drought, pollution, severe storms, flooding, health emergencies, and habitat and species loss. To build a robust youth component to state climate resiliency efforts, the Climate Youth Labs (CY-Labs) project will support place-based learning about climate resiliency with 120+ middle school youth using NOAA assets and elevate their voices through a national public media podcast series for youth. American Public Media and PBS Learning Media will air podcasts, inspiring more youth to create their own climate resiliency solutions. Partners include Twin Cities PBS; the University of Wisconsin-Superior; the University of Minnesota's Hennepin County 4-H program in Minneapolis; Native Suns Solar Cub program at the K-6 Ojibwe-language school in the Red Lake Nation, MN; and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). Rooted in youth empowerment and culturally responsive teaching, CY-Labs will elevate the voices of youth (ages 11-15) as they explore barriers to climate justice. The podcast programs will involve 20 youth at 4-H programs in Minneapolis serving primarily Black youth, 25 Indigenous youth from the Red Lake Nation, and 75 youth from the Northern Waters Environmental school in Hayward, WI (with 25% Ojibwe youth from the Lac Courte Oreilles Reservation), the Superior Middle School and Northwestern Middle School in Maple, WI. Educators will learn to use NOAA educational resources including Climate.gov, Teaching Climate, the Global Climate Dashboard, Climate Explorer and the U.S Climate Resilience Toolkit to help youth learn about climate change. Educators will help youth ensure the resiliency and protection of their communities in the face of climate hazards, create meaningful change within their communities, and advocate for climate resiliency solutions aligned with state resiliency plans. CY-Labs draws on recent research that shows that effective climate change education programs are personally relevant, encourage discussion to navigate controversial issues, engage in the scientific process, address misconceptions, and incorporate youth action projects. At the annual Youth Climate Justice Summit in St. Paul, MN and at Superior Days in Madison, WI students will share their solutions with state legislators. Program collaborators include Climate Generation, the Lake Superior Research Institute, NOAA's Lake Superior National Estuarine Research Reserve, the MN Governor's Climate Change Subcabinet, the MN House Climate Caucus; the WI Governor's Climate Change Taskforce, the City of Superior Mayor's Office, FEMA's MN and WI State Mitigation Hazard Officers, and TPT NOW, a partnership between PBS, public health agencies and NOAA weather forecasters. Project advisors include: Frank Niepold, NOAA Climate Education Program Manager; Anne Gold, Director of Education & Outreach, NOAA Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences; Jen Kretser, Director of Climate Initiatives, The Wild Center; Jothsna Harris, Change Narrative; Dr. Michael Notaro, NOAA Great Lakes Integrated Sciences and Assessments; Dr. Chris Tessum, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign; Capitol Climate Connection podcasters Patti Acomb and Jamie Long; City Climate Corner podcaster Larry Kraft; Brains On! podcast producers Molly Bloom, Sanden Totten and Marc Sanchez; and Dr. Lisa Gardiner, John Ristvey, Keliann LaConte and Becca Hatheway, UCAR. The evaluator is Dr. Lauren M. Shea.

Award Number: NA22SEC0080009
Grant Dates: 01/01/2023 to 12/31/2024
PI: Rita Karl
State: Minnesota   County:   Ramsey District: MN04
Partners: University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Center for Science Education · Natural History Museum of the Adirondacks / The Wild Center · Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) · Climate Generation · University of Wisconsin–Superior / Center for Continuing Education · University of Minnesota–Extension · Native Sun Community Power Development · University of Wisconsin–Madison / Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies · University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign / Civil & Environmental Engineering · APM Studios · Minnesota Department of Agriculture · Minnesota Department of Natural Resources · Minnesota Department of Transportation · Minnesota Department of Public Safety / Division of Homeland Security & Emergency Management · Wisconsin Emergency Management · City of Superior / Mayor's Office · University of Wisconsin–Superior / Lake Superior Research Institute · PBS Learning Media · Northern Waters Environmental School · Maple School District · Superior Middle School · NOAA Climate Program Office (CPO) · National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) Lake Superior · University of Colorado Boulder / CIRES / Education & Outreach ·

Climate Strong—Building Tribal Youth Leadership for Climate Resiliency

Funding: $499,407
Year: 2018
Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College in partnership with the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission, 1854 Treaty Authority, University of Wisconsin Extension’s G-WOW program, and Lake Superior Estuarine Research Reserve are proud to provide the Climate Strong-Building Tribal Youth Leadership for Climate Resiliency program.

Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College in partnership with the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission, 1854 Treaty Authority, University of Wisconsin Extension’s G-WOW program, and Lake Superior Estuarine Research Reserve are proud to provide the Climate Strong-Building Tribal Youth Leadership for Climate Resiliency program. Our three-year project aims to increase the knowledge and readiness of middle to high school students to deal with the impacts of extreme weather and environmental hazards that face the Ojibwe Ceded Territories (Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan) and build capacity for increased climate change community resiliency curriculum in the classroom. Climate change impacts everyone, but for indigenous peoples it threatens culturally significant traditions, such as wild rice harvesting, that relies on sustainable fish, plant, and wildlife resources. These resources are critical for subsistence, spiritual and cultural needs, and treaty rights. Culturally relevant, place-based education is an important tool to involve students, in particular, underrepresented students, in developing critical thinking skills to assess the issue of community resiliency to extreme weather events and engaging in action to help resolve it. In order to achieve our objectives, we will aim our educational efforts toward youth first, as well as reaching the communities we serve. Each year, six residential youth camps (18 total) will be hosted within the Ojibwe Ceded Territories. Each three-day camp will be focused on investigating issues of community resiliency, adaption, and mitigation associated with increasing extreme weather events as well as natural environmental hazards. Camps will use place-based, experiential lessons to teach resiliency issues demonstrated by climate change effects on Ojibwe culturally important natural resources. Our project will train formal and informal educators throughout the Ojibwe Ceded Territories on how to use indigenous climate curriculum using tribal traditional ecological knowledge and NOAA assets to investigate community climate resiliency issues. Using both teacher “train the trainer” workshops and our camps, this project will create a network of formal K-12 and informal educators trained to become leaders in providing culturally relevant climate resiliency outreach to students. We will increase community resiliency literacy through six community outreach events each year (18 total) that will highlight resiliency issues facing our region and the research being done on landscape and ecological vulnerabilities through NOAA and tribal assets. Our goals are increased community resiliency literacy and adaptation of stewardship behaviors that reduce climate change impacts and increases adaption and mitigation behaviors by our participants. These behaviors will help increase stewardship practices reducing extreme weather impacts affecting the sustainability of culturally relevant resources, thereby preserving important cultural, spiritual, subsistence, and treaty rights practices.

Award Number: NA18SEC0080009
Grant Dates: 10/01/2018 to 08/31/2022
PI: Courtney Kowalczak
State: Minnesota   County:   Carlton District: MN08
Partners: National Sea Grant College Program / University of Minnesota (UM) / Minnesota Sea Grant · National Sea Grant College Program / University of Wisconsin / Wisconsin Sea Grant · National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) Lake Superior · University of Wisconsin–Extension / Environmental Outreach · Great Lakes Indian Fish & Wildlife Commission · Fond du Lac Environmental Program · 1854 Treaty Authority · Climate Generation · University of Minnesota–Duluth ·