Explore awards

Use the filter menu and interactive map to explore the past competitions offered and grants awarded through the Environmental Literacy Program.

To learn more about project findings and outcomes, view the summaries of our grantees’ summative evaluation reports.

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CoCoRaHS: The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network

Colorado State University offsite link · Fort Collins, Colorado
Funding: $585,005
Year: 2006
The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) involves thousands of people of all ages in the observation and study of weather, climate and water resources. In CoCoRaHS, citizens of all ages help measure and report rain, hail and snow from their own homes, schools and businesses. These data are then efficiently collected via the internet, archived in a national database, and made immediately available to participants, scientists and the general public showing the fascinating patterns of precipitation from each passing storm (see http://www.cocorahs.org).

The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) involves thousands of people of all ages in the observation and study of weather, climate and water resources. In CoCoRaHS, citizens of all ages help measure and report rain, hail and snow from their own homes, schools and businesses. These data are then efficiently collected via the internet, archived in a national database, and made immediately available to participants, scientists and the general public showing the fascinating patterns of precipitation from each passing storm (see http://www.cocorahs.org). The measurement of precipitation and the patterns, variations and impacts that result, open the door to creative study of our environment. It is the "lowest common denominator" of hydroclimatic exploration. In this project, data from the CoCoRaHS citizen science network will be shared with and utilized by NOAA partners to help monitor drought, to help detect local severe storms, to alert local authorities to developing flash flood situations, to provide "ground truth" for NOAA and NASA remote sensing technologies, and to provide verification for both local and national weather and climate forecast products.

Award Number: NA06SEC4690004
Grant Dates: 10/01/2006 to 09/30/2010
PI: Nolan Doesken
State: Colorado   County:   Larimer District: CO02
Partners: American Meteorological Society (AMS) ·

Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS)

Colorado State University offsite link · Fort Collins, Colorado
Funding: $1,252,392
Year: 2010
The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) is a citizen science program where thousands of volunteers across the country measure and report the amount of precipitation that falls each day in their own neighborhood. In the next three years CoCoRaHS will use strategies from the “Citizen Science Toolkit” and align activities to the “Essential Principles to Climate Science” to engage thousands more participants in collecting, reporting and exploring precipitation. Evapotranspiration measurements will be added to teach and demonstrate the hydrologic cycle in action.

The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) is a citizen science program where thousands of volunteers across the country measure and report the amount of precipitation that falls each day in their own neighborhood. In the next three years CoCoRaHS will use strategies from the “Citizen Science Toolkit” and align activities to the “Essential Principles to Climate Science” to engage thousands more participants in collecting, reporting and exploring precipitation. Evapotranspiration measurements will be added to teach and demonstrate the hydrologic cycle in action. Through strong NOAA partnerships with the National Weather Service, the National Climatic Data Center, the Earth Systems Research Lab and the National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center, precipitation data quality and accessibility for professional users will be enhanced. The CoCoRaHS network will be constructing training, data entry and visualization tools utilizing Web 2.0 concepts, cyberlearning tools and hand-held device applications with a goal of increasing participation and expanding the volunteer network into broader, younger, more diverse audiences.

Award Number: NA10SEC0080012
Grant Dates: 10/01/2010 to 09/30/2015
PI: Chris Kummerow
State: Colorado   County:   Larimer District: CO02
Partners: Denver Museum of Nature and Science · Birch Aquarium at Scripps · Cornell University / Cornell Lab of Ornithology · Oregon State University / PRISM Climate Group · Colorado Division of Water Resources, State Engineers Office · University of South Carolina (USC) / Department of Geography · National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) · NOAA National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center · NOAA Pacific Tsunami Warning Center · NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) / National Centers for Environmental Prediction · National Avalanche Center · U.S. Department of Agriculture Headquarters · Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) ·

Hurricanes and Climate Change: Local Impacts and Global Systems

Funding: $500,921
Year: 2010
The Miami Science Museum, in collaboration with Ideum and the Institute for Learning Innovation, is designing and developing an interactive multi-user exhibit that allows visitors to explore the global dimensions and local impacts of climate change. The exhibit will raise public understanding about the underlying science, the human causes, and the potential impacts of climate change by combining the attraction of a 4-foot spherical display with a user-controlled interface that lets visitors control the sphere and choose from a range of global and local content they wish to explore.

The Miami Science Museum, in collaboration with Ideum and the Institute for Learning Innovation, is designing and developing an interactive multi-user exhibit that allows visitors to explore the global dimensions and local impacts of climate change. The exhibit will raise public understanding about the underlying science, the human causes, and the potential impacts of climate change by combining the attraction of a 4-foot spherical display with a user-controlled interface that lets visitors control the sphere and choose from a range of global and local content they wish to explore. A particular focus is on climate-related impacts on coastal communities, including the dangers posed by rising sea level and the possibility of more intense hurricanes. The project emphasizes engagement of diverse, multigenerational audiences through development of an interface that is fully bilingual and that promotes social interaction. The open-source learning module will be adaptable by other museums, to explore climate impacts specific to their region.

Award Number: NA10SEC0080024
Grant Dates: 10/01/2010 to 12/30/2012
PI: Jennifer Santer
State: Florida   County:   Miami-Dade District: FL27
Partners: Institute for Learning Innovation · Ideum · University of Miami / Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS) ·

Ocean Science - Formal and Informal Education for Ocean Literacy

Seattle Aquarium offsite link · Seattle, Washington
Funding: $599,735
Year: 2006
The Ocean Science project integrates the Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts into a Western Washington region-wide, coordinated program of formal and informal education consisting of: 1. Teacher professional development in the ocean sciences to integrate the Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts into inquiry-based marine science education and instruction; 2.

The Ocean Science project integrates the Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts into a Western Washington region-wide, coordinated program of formal and informal education consisting of: 1. Teacher professional development in the ocean sciences to integrate the Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts into inquiry-based marine science education and instruction; 2. Evaluation and re-alignment of existing Sound Science ecosystems curricula into Ocean Science, incorporating NOAA data and promoting the Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts; 3. Classroom programs, beach field investigations, and on-site programs at the Seattle Aquarium of the Olympic Coast national Marine Sanctuary's Olympic Coast Discovery Center for grades 4-5 students, their parents and teachers; 4. Parent training in ocean science content, the Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts, and inquiry-based methods for supporting their children's science education; 5. Informal education for the general public via an interactive learning station linked to the Window on Washington Waters exhibit and designed to innovatively use NOAA data and information (videos, computer simulations and other creative media) to increase and evaluate ocean literacy in adults and children. Window on Washington Waters displays the outer coast marine environments and sea life of the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary.

Award Number: NA06SEC4690008
Grant Dates: 09/01/2006 to 08/31/2011
PI: Kathleen Sider
State: Washington   County:   King District: WA07
Partners: Highline Public Schools · Seattle Public Schools · Environmental Science Center (ESC) · Feiro Marine Life Center (Feiro) · Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife ·

Visualizing Change: Training and Tools to Support Informal Educators

Seattle Aquarium offsite link · Seattle, Washington
Funding: $121,751
Year: 2013
A consortium of Aquarium of the Pacific, National Aquarium in Baltimore, New England Aquarium and Seattle Aquarium will build educator capacity in the aquarium community and informal science education field to more effectively communicate about climate change and its impact on coastal zones and marine life. The project will utilize NOAA datasets and visualizations in providing interpreters with training and strategic framing communication tools based on the best available social and cognitive research.

A consortium of Aquarium of the Pacific, National Aquarium in Baltimore, New England Aquarium and Seattle Aquarium will build educator capacity in the aquarium community and informal science education field to more effectively communicate about climate change and its impact on coastal zones and marine life. The project will utilize NOAA datasets and visualizations in providing interpreters with training and strategic framing communication tools based on the best available social and cognitive research. The objectives of the project are to: (1) develop and test four exemplary interpretive “visual narratives” that integrate research-based strategic communication with NOAA data visualization resources; (2) test the application of the visual narratives in a variety of geographic regions and institution types (aquarium, science center, etc.) using multiple technology platforms; (3) build a professional development program for climate change interpretation with data visualization; and (4) leverage existing networks for dissemination and peer support. Other key partners include the NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory (VisLab), the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), the Exploratorium in San Francisco, the Ocean Explorium in southern Massachusetts, FrameWorks Institute and New Knowledge Organization.

Award Number: NA13SEC0080011
Grant Dates: 10/01/2013 to 09/30/2017
PI: Jim Wharton
State: Washington   County:   King District: WA07
Partners: Aquarium of the Pacific · Exploratorium · Monterey Bay Aquarium · National Aquarium / National Aquarium In Baltimore (NAIB) · New England Aquarium Corporation / New England Aquarium (NEAq) · Science Museum of Minnesota · Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) · NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory · NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) ·

Carbon Networks

Funding: $142,718
Year: 2014
Carbon Networks addresses the disconnect between scientific evidence and the public’s understanding of the impacts of ocean acidification and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

Carbon Networks addresses the disconnect between scientific evidence and the public’s understanding of the impacts of ocean acidification and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. It brings together three diverse, informal education partners – the Exploratorium in San Francisco, the Waikiki Aquarium in Hawaii, and the Pacific Science Center in Seattle – in a collaborative project to co-design and implement professional development for staff and local educators, as well as create educational programs and activities for museum visitors to better understand the evolving narrative and impact of ocean acidification and climate change.

Award Number: NA14SEC0080001
Grant Dates: 09/01/2014 to 08/31/2018
PI: Andrew Rossiter
State: Hawaii   County:   Honolulu District: HI01
Partners: Exploratorium · Pacific Science Center · University of California at Santa Barbara · NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) · NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) · National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) / Southwest Fisheries Science Center · National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Channel Islands · National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Greater Farallones · National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Cordell Bank · National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Olympic Coast · U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System / CeNCOOS · University of California—Berkeley · National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) / Monterey Bay · U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System / PacIOOS · University of California—Davis ·