Explore awards

Use the filter menu and interactive map to explore the past competitions offered and grants awarded through the Environmental Literacy Program.

To learn more about project findings and outcomes, view the summaries of our grantees’ summative evaluation reports.

Supporting NOAA's Mission by Improving Pre-college Teachers' Knowledge of the Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences

Funding: $2,940,000
Year: 2007
The American Meteorological Society (AMS) Education Program is continuing its development and implementation of a highly innovative NOAA/AMS partnership built on the recognition that teachers are key to realizing NOAA's and AMS's shared vision of an environmentally literate public and a geoscience workforce that reflects the human diversity of American society. This proposed phase of the program focuses on the crucial professional development of pre-college teachers in the pedagogical content knowledge of the essential principles and fundamental concepts of the atmospheric and ocean sciences.

The American Meteorological Society (AMS) Education Program is continuing its development and implementation of a highly innovative NOAA/AMS partnership built on the recognition that teachers are key to realizing NOAA's and AMS's shared vision of an environmentally literate public and a geoscience workforce that reflects the human diversity of American society. This proposed phase of the program focuses on the crucial professional development of pre-college teachers in the pedagogical content knowledge of the essential principles and fundamental concepts of the atmospheric and ocean sciences. Project Activities and Expected Outcomes: Central to the program is the offering of the AMS DataStreme Ocean and DataStreme Atmosphere courses for in-service teachers and the content-similar undergraduate AMS Online Weather Studies and Online Ocean Studies courses for pre-service teachers. All AMS courses include delivery of engaging inquiry-based investigations of the ocean and atmospheric environments employing Internet-delivered NOAA products and services. The proposed project will expand a cadre of pre-college teachers well trained in the essential principles and fundamental concepts, online data sources, and pedagogical issues related to the teaching of atmospheric and ocean sciences from an Earth system perspective. Participating in-service teachers are committed to changing the way they teach atmospheric or oceanographic topics, will serve as resource agents in their schools, and are expected to provide leadership in science curriculum reform at local, state, and national levels. During this proposed funding, AMS DataStreme courses will train 4,000 teachers via semester-long graduate courses at 50 or more sites nationally via Local Implementation Teams (LITs). Within two years of training, in-service teachers will directly impact 40,000 other teachers and 1,400,000 pre-college students. AMS undergraduate courses with similar pedagogical and content underpinnings will impact thousands of pre-service teachers on hundreds of campuses. Rationale: The AMS, working closely with NOAA line offices and personnel, outstanding pre-college teachers, and science educators around the country, is transforming Earth system science education across the pre-college curriculum by addressing what and how teachers teach. Trained content-competent teachers are essential to realizing a scientifically literate public and creating a high-quality geoscience workforce that reflects and benefits from the diversity of American society. The AMS recognizes that teachers must experience learning that incorporates an Earth system science perspective and develop pedagogical content knowledge if they are to more effectively deliver authentic inquiry-based instruction in their classrooms. Major Project Partners: All NOAA line offices have been and will continue to be partners as AMS assists NOAA in advancing its goals of environmental assessment and prediction, protection of life and property, and the fostering of global environmental stewardship. The State University of New York grants tuition-waived graduate-level credit for the DataStreme courses.

Competition: 2007: Program for Professional Development of Educators in Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences
Award Number: NA07SEC4690023
Grant Dates: 10/01/2007 to 09/30/2012
PI: James Brey
State: Massachusetts   County:   Suffolk District: MA08
Partners: State University of New York at Stony Brook ·

Sailing Elementary Teachers Towards Ocean Literacy Using Familiar Water Resources

Funding: $461,534
Year: 2007
This project plans to increase elementary and undergraduate ocean science and related Great Lakes science literacy that aligns with the Michigan Curriculum, the national science standards, and the Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts.

This project plans to increase elementary and undergraduate ocean science and related Great Lakes science literacy that aligns with the Michigan Curriculum, the national science standards, and the Ocean Literacy Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts. We will 1) develop an elementary storybook and other elementary classroom materials that support ocean and Great Lakes literacy, 2) train pre-service elementary teachers to use this Storybook, 3) develop undergraduate activities that support the NOAA Education Plan and Ocean Literacy in teacher education courses at Eastern Michigan University (EMU), and 4) train teachers in Detroit and Dexter (MI) and Golden (CO) to use an elementary storybook and related activities that support Ocean Literacy. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research and oceanographic experts at EMU and the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) will partner with us to develop the elementary storybook. This elementary resource will be freely available to all teachers, via the internet (see http://www.windows2universe.org/teacher_resources/ocean_education/curre…). Our second objective is that teachers will relate ocean and Great Lakes science to theirs and their students' lives. We will accomplish this by 1) producing teacher-friendly web resources that make Great Lakes data from GLERL accessible for use by elementary teachers and 2) teaching pre-service teachers to interpret these data during undergraduate, inquiry activities at EMU. Our third objective is to measure environmental, ocean and Great Lakes literacy among pre-service teachers and their students before and after implementation of targeted instruction. We will accomplish this via 1) assessing pre- and in-service teachers' content knowledge and ability to apply content knowledge in ocean and Great Lakes science, 2) assessing elementary children for content knowledge and ability to apply content knowledge in ocean and Great Lakes science, 3) performance assessments of pre- and in-service teachers' abilities to interpret environmental data, 4) standardized tests of Earth Science content knowledge, and 5) surveys of pre- and in-service teachers' attitudes towards ocean literacy and supporting materials.

Award Number: NA07SEC4690004
Grant Dates: 10/01/2007 to 09/30/2012
PI: Sandra Rutherford
State: Michigan   County:   Washtenaw District: MI12
Partners: University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Center for Science Education · City University of New York (CUNY) / Hunter College ·

Community Partnership for Resilience

Funding: $481,110
Year: 2017
The New England Aquarium worked with the Metropolitan Area Planning Council to establish Community Partnerships for Resilience (CPR) starting in 2017. CPR created partnerships in three Boston-area communities that face severe risk from a changing climate – Chelsea, Hull, and Lynn, MA. Project leads worked with local professionals with diverse and relevant expertise in climate science, engineering, community planning and community action, as well as representatives from local schools or school-based educational programs serving youth in Grades 4 through 8.

The New England Aquarium worked with the Metropolitan Area Planning Council to establish Community Partnerships for Resilience (CPR) starting in 2017. CPR created partnerships in three Boston-area communities that face severe risk from a changing climate – Chelsea, Hull, and Lynn, MA. Project leads worked with local professionals with diverse and relevant expertise in climate science, engineering, community planning and community action, as well as representatives from local schools or school-based educational programs serving youth in Grades 4 through 8. Partners determined the most critical, climate-related hazards for their area that would benefit from public involvement and understanding. With a focus on extreme heat, inland flooding and storm surge, project leads, and educators developed a curriculum framework. The framework was used as a guide for the creation of a unit that had students explore the identified hazards and create a Public Education Project (PEP) to communicate with community stakeholders to drive both understanding and action. Through a series of collaborative working Summer Institutes, project partners led teachers on an exploration of the framework materials, relevant science content, and a crash course on Project Based Learning techniques. Implementation of the unit in the 2018-2019 and 2019-2020 school years led to further refinement of the curriculum framework, insight on the need for further teacher supports, and improved relationships and connections with municipal and community contacts. The resulting curriculum framework was finalized alongside partner teachers in the spring and summer of 2020 and can be adapted to different climate resilience topics and PEPs, as driven by student interest. Students themselves represent a key constituency – they will be most directly impacted by future changes, and they will need civic capacity to foster positive change. Teacher resources also include a rubric to evaluate PEP plans to meet project objectives, resources on trauma-informed teachers from colleagues at Riverside Trauma Center (Needham, MA), instructional and motivation videos from educator partners on key unit phases, and a beta version of a mapping portal developed with partners at Metropolitan Area Planning Council using layered data across a variety of sources. As a result of this project, participating educators showed an increase in knowledge and awareness about climate change on a broad level, as well as local impacts in their specific Massachusetts region. CPR participation also made educators more comfortable collaborating with other educators and inviting outside expert voices for lessons. By working collaboratively, participating teachers felt they were able to better support their students to impact their communities in a positive way. CPR provided the opportunity to have students work together to communicate with the public using PEPs, allowing students and community members to collaborate in “a common effort to increase climate resilience.” As a result of this, CPR was able to expand the group of change agents who could tackle critical environmental challenges and strengthen their communities.

Award Number: NA17SEC0080001
Grant Dates: 10/01/2017 to 09/30/2020
PI: Rebekah Stendahl
State: Massachusetts   County:   Suffolk District: MA08
Partners: NOAA Climate Program Office (CPO) · Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) · National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) / Greater Atlantic · Girls Incorporated of Lynn · Museum of Science Boston · Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC) · Harwood Institute · City of Chelsea / Planning & Development Department · Chelsea Public Schools · Hull Public Schools · Town of Hull / Community Development & Planning Department · Barr Foundation · University of Massachusetts Boston / School for the Environment · City of Lynn / Public Health Division · Lynn Public Schools · GreenRoots · Hull Lifesaving Museum (HLM) · Neighbor to Neighbor (Lynn) ·