Explore awards

Use the filter menu and interactive map to explore the past competitions offered and grants awarded through the Environmental Literacy Program.

To learn more about project findings and outcomes, view the summaries of our grantees’ summative evaluation reports.

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Raindrop: An Innovative Educational Tool for River Awareness

Butler University offsite link · Indianapolis, Indiana
Funding: $259,770
Year: 2010
This project will create a new educational tool for river awareness in the United States through a mobile device application called Raindrop. Raindrop traces the flow of water from the user's home location to a downstream watershed location. Raindrop is part of a larger installation named FLOW (Can You See the River?), which joins the cognitive power of science with the affective power of the arts by creating virtual and physical spaces for river awareness in the White River watershed in Indianapolis, IN.

This project will create a new educational tool for river awareness in the United States through a mobile device application called Raindrop. Raindrop traces the flow of water from the user's home location to a downstream watershed location. Raindrop is part of a larger installation named FLOW (Can You See the River?), which joins the cognitive power of science with the affective power of the arts by creating virtual and physical spaces for river awareness in the White River watershed in Indianapolis, IN. In addition to the flow path, Raindrop functionality includes watershed context and physical marker mapping, flow path water quality indicators, utilization of NOAA weather feeds and alerts, weather and climate comparisons, storm event size implications, and guidance on watershed restoration actions. Artist-designed physical markers are strategically located in the watershed to direct the virtual user to physical areas of interest.

Award Number: NA10SEC0080027
Grant Dates: 10/01/2010 to 09/30/2013
PI: Timothy Carter
State: Indiana   County:   Marion District: IN07
Partners: Indianapolis Museum of Art (IMA) · IUPUI's Center for Earth & Environmental Science (CEES) · IUPUI's Indianapolis Mapping and Geographic Infrastructure System (IMAGIS) · Marian University · City as a Living Laboratory · Office of the Mayor of Indianapolis · Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art · Purdue University / Indiana State Climate Office (Iclimate) · Project School · U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) / Indiana Water Science Center · White River Alliance · Williams Creek Consulting ·

Community Resilience Informed by Science and Experience (C-RISE)

Funding: $499,181
Year: 2015
The goal of Community Resilience Informed by Science and Experience (C-RISE) was to build the capacity of coastal communities to support resiliency planning and adaptation actions.

The goal of Community Resilience Informed by Science and Experience (C-RISE) was to build the capacity of coastal communities to support resiliency planning and adaptation actions. To accomplish this the Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI) worked with an advisory group including representatives from NOAA’s Office for Coastal Management, Maine Geological Survey, Maine Department of Environmental Protection, the cities of Portland and South Portland, Greater Portland Council of Governments, New England Environmental Finance Center, and Axiom Technologies to develop public programming that provided participants with knowledge of and access to local sea level rise data. This program, "Preparing Coastal Communities for Sea Level Rise" is a community education event that built participant knowledge in sea level rise science, future projections, and local impacts. Through visual presentations and facilitated discussions, GMRI brought regional relevancy to global climate data using local history and case studies of past flooding events. Using technology and peer discussions, GMRI staff provided participants with access to interactive data sets and maps that visualized the impacts of sea level rise and weather events on community resources like roads, parks, hospitals, schools, and other valued assets—and how climate projections will increase these impacts over time. Over the course of this grant, GMRI staff facilitated over 60 community events in over 30 coastal communities in Maine, reaching over 2,000 individuals. While many of the participants had heard about sea level rise and storm surge prior to this program, few had internalized what this meant for their own communities. Post-event surveys indicated that participants discussed flooding issues with their families, friends, and neighbors, further examined local sea level rise maps, and engaged with community decision-makers about resiliency planning. GMRI believes that strong and informed representation of citizens is vital to addressing climate challenges and resiliency actions. We continue to leverage this work through various projects as we collaborate with coastal communities to provide them with knowledge, skills, and tools needed to develop community-focused resilience plans for sea level rise.

Award Number: NA15SEC0080006
Grant Dates: 10/01/2015 to 09/30/2019
PI: Leigh Peake
State: Maine   County:   Cumberland District: ME01
Partners: NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM) · City of South Portland · City of Portland · Greater Portland Council of Governments (GPCOG) · University of Southern Maine / New England Environmental Finance Center · Axiom Technologies · Southern Maine Conservation Collaborative · State of Maine (ME) Department of Environmental Protection · Island Institute · Maine Geological Survey · Harpswell Heritage Land Trust · Nature Conservancy / Maine Field Office · Portland Society for Architecture · Upswell ·

Community Resilience Informed by Science and Experience (C-RISE)

Funding: $449,480
Year: 2020
Coastal rural communities have deep cultural connections to and rely heavily upon the marine environment and economy. Due to their remoteness, isolation from central planning agencies, and lack of financial and municipal resources, they are highly vulnerable to climate impacts such as sea level rise.

Coastal rural communities have deep cultural connections to and rely heavily upon the marine environment and economy. Due to their remoteness, isolation from central planning agencies, and lack of financial and municipal resources, they are highly vulnerable to climate impacts such as sea level rise. The Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI) and key project partners, Upswell and the Island Institute, will develop, convene and facilitate regional trainings by which Maine’s rural coastal communities can increase their capacity to plan and prepare for coastal climate impacts by developing the knowledge, skills, and relationships necessary to create data- and community-informed climate resilience plans. Cornerstone to the regional trainings is an engagement tool that builds common knowledge, incorporates diverse community value and voice, provides a framework for community planning and decision making, and builds relationships amongst participants. These trainings will also leverage and engage resilience professionals in Maine to share and represent their resources as communities apply those to their newly acquired skills and frameworks for community planning and decision making. Community leaders from the regional trainings will continue their learning through participation in a professional learning community. We will also leverage GMRI’s prior NOAA Environmental Literacy Grant, titled “Community Resilience Informed by Science and Experience (C-RISE),” to deliver community education programming that builds the capacity of residents in coastal communities to support resiliency planning and adaptation actions by providing participants with knowledge of and access to local sea level rise data. This project will serve 20 rural coastal and island communities in Maine through four regional trainings. Each community will select a diverse and equitable representation of 10 stakeholders and community leaders to participate in the trainings. Community education events will be accessible to all residents of each community. These interventions will build community literacy and capacity for developing coastal resilience plans that benefit the social, environmental, and economic health of the community and align with Maine’s Climate Action Plan. An advisory group including representatives from NOAA’s Office for Coastal Management, Maine Sea Grant, Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve, the State of Maine’s Governor’s Office of Policy Innovation and the Future, Maine Geological Survey, Maine Department of Environmental Protection, the Town of Vinalhaven, and the Town of St. George will guide the development and implementation of this project. Researchers at the University of Maine, Orono will evaluate the implementation of the project as well as assess the impact of this project on a communities’ ability to make community-informed climate plans. This project reflects NOAA’s Community Resilience Education Theory of Change, specifically supporting resilience planners and community members to develop trusting relationships focused on their collective environmental literacy through genuine conversations around resilience planning and decision making. With NOAA, we envision communities that have the capability to anticipate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from significant multi-hazard threats with minimum damage to social well-being, the economy, and the environment.

Award Number: NA20SEC0080006
Grant Dates: 10/01/2020 to 09/30/2023
PI: Gayle Bowness
State: Maine   County:   Cumberland District: ME01
Partners: NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM) · State of Maine (ME) Department of Environmental Protection · National Sea Grant College Program / University of Maine / Maine Sea Grant · National Estuarine Research Reserve (NERR) Wells · Island Institute · Maine Geological Survey · Upswell · Town of Vinalhaven · Town of St. George · State of Maine (ME) Governor’s Office of Policy Innovation and the Future ·

GLOBE Program

Funding: $2,399,000
Year: 2010
In the project entitled "The GLOBE Program 2010: Collaborative Environmental Research at Local to Global Scales", the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) will improve the functionality of the GLOBE Program (www.globe.gov) by providing: (1) new methods, tools, and services to enhance GLOBE Partner and teacher abilities to facilitate inquiry-based learning and student research, (2) initial pilot testing and assessment of student and teacher learning activities and events related to Climate Science research, (3) improvements in GLOBE's technology infrastructure and data systems

In the project entitled "The GLOBE Program 2010: Collaborative Environmental Research at Local to Global Scales", the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) will improve the functionality of the GLOBE Program (www.globe.gov) by providing: (1) new methods, tools, and services to enhance GLOBE Partner and teacher abilities to facilitate inquiry-based learning and student research, (2) initial pilot testing and assessment of student and teacher learning activities and events related to Climate Science research, (3) improvements in GLOBE's technology infrastructure and data systems (e.g. database, social networking, information management) to support collaborations between students, scientists, and teachers, and (4) development of a robust evaluation plan. In addition, the UCAR will continue to provide support to the worldwide GLOBE community, as well as program management and timely communication with program sponsors.

Competition: 2010: Support for GLOBE Program Office Activities
Award Number: NA10SEC4690010
Grant Dates: 09/01/2010 to 08/31/2012
PI: Valerie Williams
State: Colorado   County:   Boulder District: CO02
Partners: Arizona State University (ASU) Phoenix · South Dakota Game Fish and Parks · Texas State Aquarium · Florida State University · National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters · National Science Foundation (NSF) Headquarters · University of Missouri–St. Louis · University of Nevada-Reno · University of Tulsa (UT) ·

R4Ed: Rigor, Relevance, and Relationships in Resilience Education

Funding: $389,427
Year: 2018
In this project, high school students in Houma, Louisiana, will investigate which areas of their community are most vulnerable and what can be done to be resilient in the face of hurricanes and sea level rise, today and in the future. To do this, they will collect local stories of coastal erosion, hurricane damage, and disappearing land and compare them with data from the NOAA Digital Coast Tool and the NCAR Cyclone Damage Potential (CDP) Index.

In this project, high school students in Houma, Louisiana, will investigate which areas of their community are most vulnerable and what can be done to be resilient in the face of hurricanes and sea level rise, today and in the future. To do this, they will collect local stories of coastal erosion, hurricane damage, and disappearing land and compare them with data from the NOAA Digital Coast Tool and the NCAR Cyclone Damage Potential (CDP) Index. Linking the impacts that community members have experienced with the data about these events and future projections, students will identify vulnerable areas in their community, identify the types of hurricanes that have been the most destructive to their community, and make resilience recommendations that they will present to their peers and the community at large. Project partners, the UCAR Center for Science Education, the NCAR Capacity Center for Climate and Weather Extremes, and the South Louisiana Wetlands Discovery Center, will develop the curriculum, facilitate the instruction, and disseminate the educational resources to other coastal educators. The successful completion of this project will result in a model approach for how students in other coastal communities can use data, stories, and the CDP as they engage in coastal resilience planning. This model approach will be described in a collection of educational resources, allowing educators to implement the approach with students in other Gulf Coast and Atlantic locations affected by hurricanes and sea level rise.

Award Number: NA18SEC0080003
Grant Dates: 10/01/2018 to 12/30/2021
PI: Elizabeth "Lisa" Gardiner
State: Colorado   County:   Boulder District: CO02
Partners: University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) National Center for Atmospheric Research · NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) · Louisiana State University (LSU) / College of Art + Design · Center for Planning Excellence · University of New Orleans / Center for Hazards Assessment, Response & Technology (UNO-CHART) · Terrebonne Parish School District / South Terrebonne High School · South Louisiana Wetlands Discovery Center · Louisiana Department of Education · Lafourche Parish School District · Terrebonne Parish School District ·