Explore awards

Use the filter menu and interactive map to explore the past competitions offered and grants awarded through the Environmental Literacy Program.

To learn more about project findings and outcomes, view the summaries of our grantees’ summative evaluation reports.

AMS/NOAA Cooperative Program for Earth System Education (CPESE)

Funding: $1,609,799
Year: 2017
The American Meteorological Society (AMS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) work together to share knowledge and information about weather and climate, ocean, and coasts with educators and students across the country. The goal of this effort is to build a scientifically informed and engaged society and a diverse STEM workforce prepared to respond to environmental hazards.

The American Meteorological Society (AMS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) work together to share knowledge and information about weather and climate, ocean, and coasts with educators and students across the country. The goal of this effort is to build a scientifically informed and engaged society and a diverse STEM workforce prepared to respond to environmental hazards. AMS facilitates a national offering of the DataStreme Atmosphere and DataStreme Ocean courses and supports Project ATMOSPHERE leadership training workshops at the National Weather Service Training Center for in-service K-12 educators, with focus on those at schools with considerable numbers of students underrepresented in STEM. By 2023, about 2,100 educators will earn graduate credits through a partnership with California University of Pennsylvania and become confident Earth science educators. These educators are expected to impact more than 20,000 additional educators and several hundred thousand K-12 students.

Competition: 2017: Cooperative Program for Atmospheric Sciences Education
Award Number: NA17SEC0080003
Grant Dates: 10/01/2017 to 09/30/2022
PI: Wendy Abshire
State: Massachusetts   County:   Suffolk District: MA08
Partners: Consortium for Ocean Leadership · NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) / National Centers for Environmental Prediction · NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Grand Rapids, MI Forecast Office · California University of Pennsylvania (CalU) · NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Training Center · NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Quad Cities, Iowa Forecast Office · NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Newport, North Carolina Forecast Office · NOAA National Ocean Service (NOS) / NOAA Planet Stewards · American Geosciences Institute (AGI) · American Institute of Physics (AIP) · Lockheed Martin Corporation · National Association of Geoscience Teachers (NAGT) · GLOBE Program · NASA Headquarters / NASA Disasters Program · University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) / Unidata · National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA) · Austin Peay State University · Brandeis University · State University of New York (SUNY) / Oswego · University of Central Missouri · University of Mary Washington · West Virginia University Institute of Technology · EdCuration · Washington College · Adelphi University · Ohio State University (OSU) / Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center ·

HEARTForce: Hazard Education, Awareness & Resilience Taskforce

Funding: $500,000
Year: 2018
Communities in Colorado are increasingly experiencing major disruptions from environmental hazards, such as fire, flood, drought and extreme heat. With this rise in hazardous events, there is a pressing need for communities increase their resilience. An interdisciplinary team from the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) Education & Outreach Program at the University of Colorado at Boulder is developing and implementing an innovative, action-oriented youth engagement project targeting rural Colorado students, teachers and communities.

Communities in Colorado are increasingly experiencing major disruptions from environmental hazards, such as fire, flood, drought and extreme heat. With this rise in hazardous events, there is a pressing need for communities increase their resilience. An interdisciplinary team from the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) Education & Outreach Program at the University of Colorado at Boulder is developing and implementing an innovative, action-oriented youth engagement project targeting rural Colorado students, teachers and communities. Our engagement model empowers youth i) to envision community resilience through immersive scenario-based role play based on a solid understanding of the relevant science, ii) to learn about natural hazards through engaging Colorado-focused lessons, iii) to initiate conversations about hazard preparedness from within communities, and iv) to develop and implement student-led resilience action projects. The project team is developing instructional materials for middle and high school students: four lesson plans focused on different hazards (fire, flood, drought, extreme heat), four complementary scenario-based role-play games with a focus on youth empowerment and a teacher workshop based on these materials. Each school implementation follows a sequence in which the lesson plan activities are conducted, followed by a scenario-based role play game and reflection. Building on their experience with the game, students develop resilience strategies for their community and present those at a community Resilience Expo. The project has the following three objectives: 1) Increase Colorado secondary teachers’ knowledge and confidence to teach about local natural hazards, and to facilitate discussions about community resilience; 2) Increase Colorado youth’s understanding of natural hazards, their community’s vulnerability, and their involvement in resilience planning efforts, and 3) Enhance the capacity and empowerment of young people in Colorado to engage in dialogue with their peers, families, and community stakeholders about community resilience issues and identify, develop, and implement resilience actions. A needs assessment disseminated to Colorado teachers guides the project team in the development of all instructional materials and allows for customizing the content to teacher needs. The project evaluation explores the efficacy of the program model and studies the impact of the project activities on students and teachers. Specifically, the evaluation studies students’ confidence and ability to engage in dialogue around community resilience, level to which students increase their understanding of natural hazards and resilience planning, and the ways in which teachers increase their content knowledge and confidence in teaching about natural hazards. The project fills a critical gap in Colorado’s resilience planning which does not include teachers and youth. The project is guided by partners from the NOAA RISA program Western Water Assessment, seven NOAA science advisors, Science on the Sphere collaborators, and is being implemented together with over 20 community partners, school partners and collaborators from across Colorado. Over the course of the three-year program, the project activities will train and support 140 teachers, engage 400+ students and result in 11 Resilience Expo events across Colorado, from primarily rural communities. The instructional units and the games will be used in classrooms with 600+ students.

Award Number: NA18SEC0080007
Grant Dates: 10/01/2018 to 10/31/2022
PI: Anne Gold (Reuther)
State: Colorado   County:   Boulder District: CO02
Partners: Earth Force · NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) · Natural History Museum of the Adirondacks / The Wild Center · NOAA Climate Program Office (CPO) · NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Boulder, Colorado Forecast Office · NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Pueblo, Colorado Forecast Office · NOAA National Ocean Service (NOS) / NOAA Planet Stewards · Foothills United Way · City of Boulder / Office of Emergency Management · University of Massachusetts (UMASS) Lowell / Climate Change Initiative · Wild Rose Education · Roaring Fork School District No. Re-1 / Glenwood Springs Middle School · Montrose County Re-1j School District / Montrose High School · Gunnison Watershed Re1J School District / Gunnison Middle School · Early College of Arvada · St. Vrain Valley Re 1j School District / Westview Middle School · Estes Park R-3 School District / Estes Park High School · Estes Park R-3 School District / Estes Park Middle School · Garfield County / Community Development · Gunnison County / Office of Emergency Management · City of Arvada / Office of the City Manager · City of Longmont / Public Works & Natural Resources · Larimer County / Office of Emergency Management · City of Boulder / Resilient Boulder · Colorado Department of Public Safety · Colorado Department of Natural Resources · Colorado Department of Local Affairs · University of Colorado Boulder / CIRES / Education & Outreach · Mountain Studies Institute · University of Colorado Boulder / CIRES / Western Water Assessment · Adams State University / Luter Bean Museum / Salazar Rio Grande del Norte Center · Northeast Colorado BOCES · Western Colorado University · Republican River Water · Colorado State University / Colorado Water Center (CoWC) · Lower South Platte Water Conservancy District · Grand County Wildfire Council · Upper Colorado River Watershed Group · NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) / Chemical Sciences Laboratory (CSL) · NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) / Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) ·

Climate Resilience and Community-driven Action With a Hyperlocalized Public Forum

Funding: $307,685
Year: 2020
The Science Museum of Virginia will build upon its community science experience and its role as a trusted source of climate science information to lead “Climate Resilience and Community-driven Action with a Hyperlocalized Public Forum in Richmond, VA” in partnership with Virginia Community Voice, Groundwork RVA, Happily Natural Day, and Southside ReLeaf - local nonprofits with proven track records of effecting change through community engagement and urban greening initiatives.

The Science Museum of Virginia will build upon its community science experience and its role as a trusted source of climate science information to lead “Climate Resilience and Community-driven Action with a Hyperlocalized Public Forum in Richmond, VA” in partnership with Virginia Community Voice, Groundwork RVA, Happily Natural Day, and Southside ReLeaf - local nonprofits with proven track records of effecting change through community engagement and urban greening initiatives. This project supports Richmond’s work to heal social, racial, and environmental injustices by increasing community resilience to climate change through placemaking. Richmond served as both the Capital of the Confederacy and the United States’ second largest trading port for enslaved persons during the 19th century. In the 1930s and 1940s, redlining - the systematic denial of access to home loans, mortgage insurance, or credit based on an applicant’s race or ethnicity - effectively segregated people of color into less desirable urban neighborhoods. Research conducted both in Richmond and nationwide demonstrates that, today, formerly redlined neighborhoods tend to be significantly hotter, more prone to flooding, and experience poorer air quality than non-redlined areas. These neighborhoods also tend to be home to individuals - mostly Black and brown - with the fewest resources to adapt to the health and financial impacts of human-caused climate change, which continues to intensify each year. Richmond’s mayor and Office of Sustainability support this project, which will align community vision with existing planning efforts that seek to build a Richmond that is “a sustainable and resilient city with healthy air, clean water, and a flourishing ecosystem that nurtures healthy communities, increases resiliency to the effects of a changing climate through adaptation and mitigation, develops the built environment to enhance natural assets, and ensures all people have access to nature and healthy communities.” Because resiliency is a process, youth and adults participating in this project will explore hazards (specifically flooding and extreme heat); assess their vulnerability and risks (determine how climate change is currently harming, or will most likely harm, neighborhoods); investigate options (by determining which resilience-building strategies are most effective for each community and vision); prioritize and plan local resilience-building strategies (ensuring that residents’ vision can be realized); and take action by implementing and sustaining projects in the community with project partners. Strategies may include placemaking through planting trees, building permeable pathways, constructing shade structures, and creating community gardens to provide shade, fresh food, and neighborhood gathering spaces, as well as rainwater harvesting and bioretention rain gardens to mitigate stormwater issues. This project is unique because it will actively support nonprofits that engage historically underserved people whose voice is commonly left out of City planning efforts, increase their environmental literacy, and provide resources needed to enact their vision. RK&A will evaluate the project, which will build upon evaluation data from the Science Museum’s previous NOAA ELP-funded project - “Learn, Prepare, Act - Resilient Citizens Make Resilient Communities” - and a NOAA-funded project by the Museum of Science Boston - “Citizen Science, Civics, and Resilient Communities: Increasing Resilience Through Citizen-Created Data, Local Knowledge and Community Values.”

Award Number: NA20SEC0080007
Grant Dates: 12/31/2020 to 12/30/2023
PI: Jeremy Hoffman
State: Virginia   County:   Richmond City District: VA04
Partners: Museum of Science Boston · NOAA Climate Program Office (CPO) · Groundwork RVA · City of Richmond / Mayor's Office · Virginia Community Voice · Happily Natural Day ·