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Historical hurricane tracks.

Tiny tutorials: Get started using Earth science data in seconds

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Welcome
What's a tiny tutorial?
Tiny tutorial: Hurricane tracks
Critical fire weather
Space weather: Aurora forecast
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September is #DataMonth here at NOAA, and we're celebrating Earth science information. We want everyone to be able to understand and work with the data our agency collects on the ocean, atmosphere, and beyond. But we know that, when it comes to using a new online data portal, sometimes the first five clicks are the hardest.

Our new "tiny tutorials" are designed to break the ice and get you started. These simple animations walk you through our data visualizations step by step.

From there, each data portal offers many variables and dimensions to explore. So roll up your sleeves, fire up your browser, and start exploring the ocean and atmosphere. 

With historical hurricane tracks from NOAA Digital Coast, you can look for trends in where hurricanes occur or pull up the facts on a single storm. For background information on hurricanes and tropical weather, check out the educational resources on our hurricane collection.

Animated tiny tutorial for accessing information on historical hurricane tracks.

Below, you can look through each step at your own pace. 

Step 1: Go to https://coast.noaa.gov/hurricanes.
Step 1: Go to https://coast.noaa.gov/hurricanes. 
Step 2: Type the location, name, year, or basin of a hurricane and hit enter. A basin is a region of the ocean, like "North Atlantic" or "East Pacific."
Step 2: Type the location, name, year, or basin of a hurricane and hit enter. A basin is a region of the ocean, like "North Atlantic" or "East Pacific." 
Step 3: Select a storm from search results to explore data from that storm.
Step 3: Select a storm from search results to explore data from that storm.
Step 4: Explore data from the storm.
Step 4: Explore data from the storm. (NOAA Education)
Step 5: Click LEGEND to see color-coded storm categories.
Step 5: Click LEGEND to see color-coded storm categories.
Step 6: Colored circles match up with data in the DETAILS tab.
Step 6: Colored circles match up with data in the DETAILS tab.

Did you know that the National Weather Service tracks fire weather around the country? With this interactive graphical forecast, you can monitor fire weather outlooks and click on individual locations to learn more. Use the animation and step-by-step guide below to get started. 

Animated tiny tutorial for accessing the critical fire weather forecast across the continental United States.

Below, you can go through each step at your own pace. 

Step 2: Select the variable "Critical fire weather" from the second drop-down menu from the left.
Step 2: Select the variable "Critical fire weather" from the second drop-down menu from the left.
Step 3: View the current fire weather outlooks.
Step 3: View the current fire weather outlooks.
Step 4: Click the map for more information about a location. See the daily weather forecast, hourly graph, tabular graph, forecast discussion, and more.
Step 4: Click the map for more information about a location. See the daily weather forecast, hourly graph, tabular graph, forecast discussion, and more.
Step 5: Save your map settings with a bookmarkable URL.
Step 5: Save your map settings with a bookmarkable URL.

 

Did you know that outer space has weather too? Not rain or snow but winds and magnetic waves that move through space! NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center has the latest forecasts and outlooks. Here, you can view the forecast for the aurora in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. If you'd like to learn more about space weather phenomena, check out the educational resources in our space weather collection.

Animated tiny tutorial for accessing the aurora forecast.

Below, you can go through each step at your own pace. 

Step 1: Go to https://www.swpc.noaa.gov.
Step 2: Click "Products and data" in the main menu.
Step 2: Click "Products and data" in the main menu.
Step 2, continued: Under "Models," select "Aurora - 30 minute forecast."
Step 2, continued: Under "Models," select "Aurora - 30 minute forecast."
Step 3: Click the play button at the bottom left of each animation to start animations of the aurora in each hemisphere.
Step 3: Click the play button at the bottom left of each animation to start animations of the aurora in each hemisphere.
Step 4: Watch the aurora animation in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.
Step 4: Watch the aurora animation in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.
Step 5: Explore more information on aurora forecast using the tabs below the animations.
Step 5: Explore more information on aurora forecast using the tabs below the animations.

 

If you're looking for more data resources from NOAA, check out our collection of data resources for educators. There, we highlight ocean and atmospheric data sources that are easy to use and appropriate for classrooms, informal learning environments, and anyone who is interested in learning more.

Did you try our tiny tutorials? Let us know what you thought and if they worked for you. Do you have a request for the next tiny tutorial? Email us at education@noaa.gov or contact us on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, or LinkedInoffsite link

Published on
September 26, 2019