After the Oil Spill, Response Looks Ahead to Restoration

Follow the Gulf Coast Damage Assessment on Our New Website

 

NOAA's new NRDA website.

NOAA's new NRDA website.

Download here. (Credit: NOAA)

In the months since the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded — a disaster that took 11 lives and spilled millions of gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico — NOAA, the U.S. Coast Guard and numerous federal, state and local partners mounted an unprecedented response to contain and cleanup the worst oil spill in our nation’s history.

Even before the wellhead was sealed for good, NOAA and its partners were already hard at work pursuing the next — and perhaps most labor-intensive — phase of the federal effort: the Natural Resource Damage Assessment, or NRDA.

What exactly is NRDA?

It’s a thorough and scientific, stepwise legal process led by NOAA and its federal and state co-trustees that assesses spill-related impacts to the environment and seeks to compensate the public for those impacts. The NRDA process ultimately determines the actions necessary to restore the environment and compensate communities for injured or lost natural resources and services.

NOAA restoration project team assessing oiling of marshes in Barataria Bay, La.

NOAA restoration project team assessing oiling of marshes in Barataria Bay, La.

Download here. (Credit: NOAA)

Now, with just a few clicks of the mouse, you can keep your fingers on the pulse of the coordinated effort underway to restore spill-affected areas of the Gulf Coast.

At our new one-stop website, www.gulfspillrestoration.noaa.gov, you can:

As the NRDA process unfolds, the site will also serve as the repository for case documents and as an important source for public meeting dates and future restoration plans.

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Posted Dec. 2, 2010 NOAA logo.